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Alternate Paths to Modernity

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004861/00001

Material Information

Title: Alternate Paths to Modernity The Second Reich and Meiji Japan
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Schmitt, Eric
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Imperial Germany
Meiji Japan
Sonderweg
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The authoritarian modernization thesis states that Germany during the nineteenth century followed a uniquely anti-democratic path to modernity, positing that while Germany became a modern state economically, itfailed to develop along the expected modern liberal democratic lines politically. The Kaiserreich, dominated by the Prussian military establishment, is said to have suppressed the rights of its citizens and enacted dictatorial policies that would never have been made law in liberal democracies like Great Britain or the United States. This authoritarianism that defined the Second Reich is said to have directly led to the horrors of Nazism. Similarly, Japan is said to have failed to develop smoothly into a British/American style liberal democracy. Its citizens are said to have been largely disenfranchised and the military supposedly exerted undue influence of the civilian political sphere. This thesis attempts to argue against the intensity of these claims. Though Japan and Germany during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were by no means ideal liberal democracies, they were not entirely authoritarian either. Both Imperial Germany and Meiji Japan possessed a number of democratic features that dispute the authoritarian modernization thesis. Though these ultimately were fairly militaristic states that at times employed harsh anti-democratic tactics on their citizens, this thesis argues that Germany and Japan were not incredibly distinct from Britain, France, and the United States in how they actually behaved domestically and on the world stage.
Statement of Responsibility: by Eric Schmitt
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harvey, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 S35
System ID: NCFE004861:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004861/00001

Material Information

Title: Alternate Paths to Modernity The Second Reich and Meiji Japan
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Schmitt, Eric
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Imperial Germany
Meiji Japan
Sonderweg
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The authoritarian modernization thesis states that Germany during the nineteenth century followed a uniquely anti-democratic path to modernity, positing that while Germany became a modern state economically, itfailed to develop along the expected modern liberal democratic lines politically. The Kaiserreich, dominated by the Prussian military establishment, is said to have suppressed the rights of its citizens and enacted dictatorial policies that would never have been made law in liberal democracies like Great Britain or the United States. This authoritarianism that defined the Second Reich is said to have directly led to the horrors of Nazism. Similarly, Japan is said to have failed to develop smoothly into a British/American style liberal democracy. Its citizens are said to have been largely disenfranchised and the military supposedly exerted undue influence of the civilian political sphere. This thesis attempts to argue against the intensity of these claims. Though Japan and Germany during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were by no means ideal liberal democracies, they were not entirely authoritarian either. Both Imperial Germany and Meiji Japan possessed a number of democratic features that dispute the authoritarian modernization thesis. Though these ultimately were fairly militaristic states that at times employed harsh anti-democratic tactics on their citizens, this thesis argues that Germany and Japan were not incredibly distinct from Britain, France, and the United States in how they actually behaved domestically and on the world stage.
Statement of Responsibility: by Eric Schmitt
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harvey, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 S35
System ID: NCFE004861:00001


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