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It's a Brawl out There

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004829/00001

Material Information

Title: It's a Brawl out There Notes on Political Argument and a Super Smash Bros Dialogue
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mills, Justis
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Super Smash Bros
Political Argument
Philosophy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: People are often inclined to get into political arguments, but it is not always clear why we bother. In this thesis, I establish a provisional definition for what makes an argument political, explore reasons why political arguments may be more vitriolic than their nonpolitical counterparts, and lay out a set of reasons why a person might want to start a political debate. I determine that the main reason will generally be to move an opponent's position slightly toward one's own. Once I have established some better and worse reasons for arguing, I look into ways that unequal power dynamics cause many arguments to be unfair. I suggest ways to mitigate unfair arguing practices with categorical rules of thumb, employing Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice to support a virtue ethical account of avoiding arguing unfairly. My final chapter is an extended case study. I trace out a lengthy argument between four players of a popular series of video games. I analyze these arguments in part using the techniques developed in the first two chapters, as well as making some observations about expertise and the role of extreme positions in contextualizing debates between relative moderates.
Statement of Responsibility: by Justis Mills
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 M65
System ID: NCFE004829:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004829/00001

Material Information

Title: It's a Brawl out There Notes on Political Argument and a Super Smash Bros Dialogue
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mills, Justis
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Super Smash Bros
Political Argument
Philosophy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: People are often inclined to get into political arguments, but it is not always clear why we bother. In this thesis, I establish a provisional definition for what makes an argument political, explore reasons why political arguments may be more vitriolic than their nonpolitical counterparts, and lay out a set of reasons why a person might want to start a political debate. I determine that the main reason will generally be to move an opponent's position slightly toward one's own. Once I have established some better and worse reasons for arguing, I look into ways that unequal power dynamics cause many arguments to be unfair. I suggest ways to mitigate unfair arguing practices with categorical rules of thumb, employing Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice to support a virtue ethical account of avoiding arguing unfairly. My final chapter is an extended case study. I trace out a lengthy argument between four players of a popular series of video games. I analyze these arguments in part using the techniques developed in the first two chapters, as well as making some observations about expertise and the role of extreme positions in contextualizing debates between relative moderates.
Statement of Responsibility: by Justis Mills
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 M65
System ID: NCFE004829:00001


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