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ORACLES, ADVISERS, AND POETS

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004798/00001

Material Information

Title: ORACLES, ADVISERS, AND POETS CONSTRUCTING AUTHORITY IN THE HISTORIES OF HERODOTUS
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kingdon, William
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Herodotus
Oracle
Homer
Hesiod
History
Archaic
Delphi
Velphic
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Herodotus was a fifth-century writer who produced The Histories. He is considered the "Father of History", and his work is likewise considered the first text of the genre "history". This new genre had to borrow conventions from earlier texts, and also establish new ones. This thesis will make several arguments about those conventions, especially the convention of Herodotus's persistent first-person voice. In the first chapter, close-reading of the text will show that Herodotus uses the authority and knowledge of the Oracle at Delphi as a model for his own authoritative voice. It is argued that Herodotus also models his "wise-advisers" off the Oracle. In the second chapter, it will be shown how Herodotus aligns himself in importance with Homer and Hesiod, the two great archaic poets. It will also be shown that Hesiod, more likely than Homer, established the convention of persistent and authorital first-person voice. The last chapter argues a pessimistic view of both the "didactic interpretation" of Herodotus and the efficacy of "wise-advisers" and their oracle-like power.
Statement of Responsibility: by William Kingdon
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Shaw, Carl

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 K52
System ID: NCFE004798:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004798/00001

Material Information

Title: ORACLES, ADVISERS, AND POETS CONSTRUCTING AUTHORITY IN THE HISTORIES OF HERODOTUS
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kingdon, William
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Herodotus
Oracle
Homer
Hesiod
History
Archaic
Delphi
Velphic
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Herodotus was a fifth-century writer who produced The Histories. He is considered the "Father of History", and his work is likewise considered the first text of the genre "history". This new genre had to borrow conventions from earlier texts, and also establish new ones. This thesis will make several arguments about those conventions, especially the convention of Herodotus's persistent first-person voice. In the first chapter, close-reading of the text will show that Herodotus uses the authority and knowledge of the Oracle at Delphi as a model for his own authoritative voice. It is argued that Herodotus also models his "wise-advisers" off the Oracle. In the second chapter, it will be shown how Herodotus aligns himself in importance with Homer and Hesiod, the two great archaic poets. It will also be shown that Hesiod, more likely than Homer, established the convention of persistent and authorital first-person voice. The last chapter argues a pessimistic view of both the "didactic interpretation" of Herodotus and the efficacy of "wise-advisers" and their oracle-like power.
Statement of Responsibility: by William Kingdon
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Shaw, Carl

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 K52
System ID: NCFE004798:00001


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