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SAME CRIME, SAME TIME?

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004752/00001

Material Information

Title: SAME CRIME, SAME TIME? GENDER, RACE AND JAIL SENTENCING
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Echevarria, Mar
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Race
Gender
Crime
Jail
Sentencing
Drugs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Currently in the United States, African-American women are incarcerated at a rate 3 times as high as White women. After the establishment of the War on Drugs in the 1980s, incarceration rates tripled, with a particular increase in Black inmates. For my study I investigated whether or not there were racial discrepancies in sentencing amongst women. I gathered data about females that were incarcerated in 2011 from a jail in Florida. I conducted one-way and two-way analysis of variances to determine whether or not race was a significant factor in determining sentencing length across crime type and drug type. I found that race did not have a significant interaction with sentencing length. I conclude that although race was not a significant factor within my population, I can not generalize the situation because of the inconsistencies in racial classification and sentencing guidelines across different states' criminal justice systems. Therefore, I find that this is a topic worthy of constant attention as changes in legislation affect the future of incarcerated women of color.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mar Echevarria
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fairchild, Emily

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 E18
System ID: NCFE004752:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004752/00001

Material Information

Title: SAME CRIME, SAME TIME? GENDER, RACE AND JAIL SENTENCING
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Echevarria, Mar
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2013
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Race
Gender
Crime
Jail
Sentencing
Drugs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Currently in the United States, African-American women are incarcerated at a rate 3 times as high as White women. After the establishment of the War on Drugs in the 1980s, incarceration rates tripled, with a particular increase in Black inmates. For my study I investigated whether or not there were racial discrepancies in sentencing amongst women. I gathered data about females that were incarcerated in 2011 from a jail in Florida. I conducted one-way and two-way analysis of variances to determine whether or not race was a significant factor in determining sentencing length across crime type and drug type. I found that race did not have a significant interaction with sentencing length. I conclude that although race was not a significant factor within my population, I can not generalize the situation because of the inconsistencies in racial classification and sentencing guidelines across different states' criminal justice systems. Therefore, I find that this is a topic worthy of constant attention as changes in legislation affect the future of incarcerated women of color.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mar Echevarria
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2013
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fairchild, Emily

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2013 E18
System ID: NCFE004752:00001


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