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"Some Kind of Smart-Smart for True"

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004632/00001

Material Information

Title: "Some Kind of Smart-Smart for True" Examining Trickster Heroes in Four North American Folklore Traditions
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Marz, Rose
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2012
Publication Date: 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Literature
Folklore
American Literature
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines four distinct folklore traditions from across the North American continent �the African American, Franco-Canadian, Appalachian and Cajun�by comparing the characteristics and stories of their prominent trickster heroes: Br'er Rabbit, Ti-Jean, Jack, and Lapin. The folk heroes I examine arose among the New World immigrants who were living in an unstable environment. These socially and geographically marginalized groups used folklore creation to strengthen their internal community and develop strategies of subversive resistance against the larger social hierarchy. I argue that these folklore heroes are representative of the cultural adaptations used by the groups to adjust to their new social and natural environment. To this end, I also compare these figures to the folktale heroes prevalent among the groups before they immigrated to the American continent, establishing the differences between the trickster heroes of the Old and New Worlds. While my primary methodology is close-reading, I also I draw on a background of literary and folkloric theory from the past century. The first chapter examines the figure of Br'er Rabbit in the African American tradition found in the Southern United States, establishing this trickster rabbit as a continuation of oral folklore traditions brought to the United States by African slaves and then demonstrating how Br'er Rabbit participates in the creation of subversive strategies of resistance. The second chapter considers the paired figures of Jack, of the Appalachian Mountain tradition, and Ti-Jean, whose stories are told throughout the French Canadian provinces. The chapter explores the similarities inherent to the Jack and Ti-Jean traditions, as well as the differing concerns and motivations reflected both in the divergent European sources for the tales and their respective American folktale traditions. The third chapter highlights the effect of folklore diffusion on a tradition, using the Cajun folklore tradition as a case study. The chapter examines a selection of tales that feature Louisiana French manifestations of Ti-Jean and Br'er Rabbit, heroes added to the Cajun tradition by Acadian and African American tale tellers. The texts of some of the tales analyzed in the thesis are included in appendices. This thesis concludes by establishing these stories in the context of the larger American literary tradition.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rose Marz
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2012
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Reid, Amy

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2012 M3
System ID: NCFE004632:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004632/00001

Material Information

Title: "Some Kind of Smart-Smart for True" Examining Trickster Heroes in Four North American Folklore Traditions
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Marz, Rose
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2012
Publication Date: 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Literature
Folklore
American Literature
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines four distinct folklore traditions from across the North American continent �the African American, Franco-Canadian, Appalachian and Cajun�by comparing the characteristics and stories of their prominent trickster heroes: Br'er Rabbit, Ti-Jean, Jack, and Lapin. The folk heroes I examine arose among the New World immigrants who were living in an unstable environment. These socially and geographically marginalized groups used folklore creation to strengthen their internal community and develop strategies of subversive resistance against the larger social hierarchy. I argue that these folklore heroes are representative of the cultural adaptations used by the groups to adjust to their new social and natural environment. To this end, I also compare these figures to the folktale heroes prevalent among the groups before they immigrated to the American continent, establishing the differences between the trickster heroes of the Old and New Worlds. While my primary methodology is close-reading, I also I draw on a background of literary and folkloric theory from the past century. The first chapter examines the figure of Br'er Rabbit in the African American tradition found in the Southern United States, establishing this trickster rabbit as a continuation of oral folklore traditions brought to the United States by African slaves and then demonstrating how Br'er Rabbit participates in the creation of subversive strategies of resistance. The second chapter considers the paired figures of Jack, of the Appalachian Mountain tradition, and Ti-Jean, whose stories are told throughout the French Canadian provinces. The chapter explores the similarities inherent to the Jack and Ti-Jean traditions, as well as the differing concerns and motivations reflected both in the divergent European sources for the tales and their respective American folktale traditions. The third chapter highlights the effect of folklore diffusion on a tradition, using the Cajun folklore tradition as a case study. The chapter examines a selection of tales that feature Louisiana French manifestations of Ti-Jean and Br'er Rabbit, heroes added to the Cajun tradition by Acadian and African American tale tellers. The texts of some of the tales analyzed in the thesis are included in appendices. This thesis concludes by establishing these stories in the context of the larger American literary tradition.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rose Marz
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2012
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Reid, Amy

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2012 M3
System ID: NCFE004632:00001


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