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Making Monsters

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004442/00001

Material Information

Title: Making Monsters Constructions of Monstrosity in Gothic Literature
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Robinson, Nicole
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2011
Publication Date: 2011

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Gothic
Monster
English
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis discusses two different constructions of monstrosity in British Gothic literature through a close reading of texts that range from 1796 to 1897. This thesis finds that in these texts monstrosity is something that can be taught, caught like an infection, or be the product of uncontrolled sexuality. The two discussions of monstrosity intersect in their concern with the dissolution or perversion of the family and society. The first chapter discusses monstrosity as insanity in Mathew Lewis's The Monk and James Hogg's The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. These novels figure human men who are so mentally perverted by their educations (particularly their religious educations) that they are monstrous and commit heinous crimes such as murder and rape. The second chapter discusses monstrosity, particularly female monstrosity, as disease and problematic reproductive ability in John Keats's �Lamia,� Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla, and Bram Stoker's Dracula. Monstrosity in the second chapter is something that can be inherently female, or something that women pass on to their children. The texts discussed in my second chapter are involved with multiple discourses about life and disease and with social constructions of Victorian women.
Statement of Responsibility: by Nicole Robinson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2011
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2011 R66
System ID: NCFE004442:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004442/00001

Material Information

Title: Making Monsters Constructions of Monstrosity in Gothic Literature
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Robinson, Nicole
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2011
Publication Date: 2011

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Gothic
Monster
English
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis discusses two different constructions of monstrosity in British Gothic literature through a close reading of texts that range from 1796 to 1897. This thesis finds that in these texts monstrosity is something that can be taught, caught like an infection, or be the product of uncontrolled sexuality. The two discussions of monstrosity intersect in their concern with the dissolution or perversion of the family and society. The first chapter discusses monstrosity as insanity in Mathew Lewis's The Monk and James Hogg's The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. These novels figure human men who are so mentally perverted by their educations (particularly their religious educations) that they are monstrous and commit heinous crimes such as murder and rape. The second chapter discusses monstrosity, particularly female monstrosity, as disease and problematic reproductive ability in John Keats's �Lamia,� Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla, and Bram Stoker's Dracula. Monstrosity in the second chapter is something that can be inherently female, or something that women pass on to their children. The texts discussed in my second chapter are involved with multiple discourses about life and disease and with social constructions of Victorian women.
Statement of Responsibility: by Nicole Robinson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2011
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2011 R66
System ID: NCFE004442:00001


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MAKING MONSTERS: CONSTRUCTIONS OF MONSTROSITY IN GOTHIC LITERATURE BY NICOLE ROBINSON A Thesis Submitted to the Division of Humanities New College of Florida in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Bachelor of Arts Under the sponsorship of Miriam Wallace Sarasota, Florida May, 2011

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ii Table of Contents Table of Contents.............................................................................................................. ..ii Abstract....................................................................................................................... ........iii Introduction..........................................................................................................................1 Chapter 1: Human Monsters and Fanatical Lunacy.............................................................4 Chapter 2: (Un)natural Ge neration: Women, Sex,............................................................ 34 Reproduction and Theories of Life andDisease Conclusion.........................................................................................................................75 Notes..................................................................................................................................78 Bibliography................................................................................................................... ....85

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iii MAKING MONSTERS: CONSTRUCTIONS OF MONSTROSITY IN GOTHIC LITERATURE Nicole Robinson New College of Florida, 2011 ABSTRACT This thesis discusses two different constructions of monstrosity in British Gothic literature through a close readi ng of texts that range from 1796 to 1897. This thesis finds that in these texts monstrosity is something that can be taught, caught like an infection, or be the product of uncontrolled sexuality. The two discussions of mons trosity intersect in their concern with the dissolu tion or perversion of the fa mily and society. The first chapter discusses monstrosity as insanity in Mathew Lewis's The Monk and James Hogg's The Private Memoirs and Confes sions of a Justified Sinner These novels figure human men who are so mentally perverted by their educations (particularly their religious educations) that they are monstrous and comm it heinous crimes such as murder and rape. The second chapter discusses monstrosity, partic ularly female monstrosity, as disease and problematic reproductive ability in John Keats's Lamia, Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla and Bram Stoker's Dracula Monstrosity in the second chap ter is something that can be inherently female, or something that women pass on to their childre n. The texts discussed in my second chapter are involved with mu ltiple discourses about life and disease and with social constructions of Victorian women. Doctor Miriam Wallace Division of Humanities


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