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Fortune, Providence, and Pity in the Works of Boccaccio, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Baldwin

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004036/00001

Material Information

Title: Fortune, Providence, and Pity in the Works of Boccaccio, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Baldwin
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wagner, Marjorie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Fortune
Providence
Pity
Boccaccio, Giovanni
De casibus virorum illustrium
Chaucer, Geoffrey
Monk's Tale
Lydgate, John
Fall of Princes
Baldwin, William
A Mirror for Magistrates
De casibus
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: I look at the changing descriptions of Fortune and providence in Giovanni Boccaccio�s De casibus virorum illustrium (1355), Geoffrey Chaucer�s "Monk�s Tale" from The Canterbury Tales (1400), John Lydgate�s Fall of Princes (1438), and A Mirror for Magistrates (1559). All of these works spring from the de casibus tradition which presents a didactic version of history. The authors give chronological history in which both guilty and innocent people fall due to either their own actions or the actions of either God or Fortune. In these works, Fortune is sometimes subordinated to the Christian God, while in others the authors give her powers equal to God�s powers. Changes in medieval definitions of tragedy and views of providence caused the de casibus tradition to move from narratives of deserved individual falls to tragedies that incite pity in their readers and politicized didactic providential histories. These shifts open the possibility that then the reader may question God�s plan for humankind (providence). I explore how each text depicts Fortune and utilizes her and providence in a manner which either questions God�s plan or places the reader at ease with his plan.
Statement of Responsibility: by Marjorie Wagner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 W1
System ID: NCFE004036:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004036/00001

Material Information

Title: Fortune, Providence, and Pity in the Works of Boccaccio, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Baldwin
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wagner, Marjorie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Fortune
Providence
Pity
Boccaccio, Giovanni
De casibus virorum illustrium
Chaucer, Geoffrey
Monk's Tale
Lydgate, John
Fall of Princes
Baldwin, William
A Mirror for Magistrates
De casibus
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: I look at the changing descriptions of Fortune and providence in Giovanni Boccaccio�s De casibus virorum illustrium (1355), Geoffrey Chaucer�s "Monk�s Tale" from The Canterbury Tales (1400), John Lydgate�s Fall of Princes (1438), and A Mirror for Magistrates (1559). All of these works spring from the de casibus tradition which presents a didactic version of history. The authors give chronological history in which both guilty and innocent people fall due to either their own actions or the actions of either God or Fortune. In these works, Fortune is sometimes subordinated to the Christian God, while in others the authors give her powers equal to God�s powers. Changes in medieval definitions of tragedy and views of providence caused the de casibus tradition to move from narratives of deserved individual falls to tragedies that incite pity in their readers and politicized didactic providential histories. These shifts open the possibility that then the reader may question God�s plan for humankind (providence). I explore how each text depicts Fortune and utilizes her and providence in a manner which either questions God�s plan or places the reader at ease with his plan.
Statement of Responsibility: by Marjorie Wagner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 W1
System ID: NCFE004036:00001

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