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Compiling Imperative and Functional Languages

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004020/00001

Material Information

Title: Compiling Imperative and Functional Languages
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Sherman, Jeremy W.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Programming Languages
Compilers
History of Computing
Code of Optimization
Haskell, Glasgow
GHC
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Computers operate at a very low level of abstraction. People think in terms of higher-level abstractions. Programming languages let people describe a computation using higher-level abstractions in such a way that the description can be translated into something a computer can execute. This translation is performed algorithmically by a program called a compiler. This thesis looks at how a compiler carries out this translation for two very different types of programming languages, the imperative and the functional. Imperative languages reflect the concept of computation that is built into modern von Neumann computers, while functional languages conceive of computation as a process of symbolic rewriting. The functional model of computation is utterly different from the von Neumann model, but programs written in functional languages must ultimately run on von Neumann machines. The thesis focuses throughout on optimizing program representation for execution on modern von Neumann computers. A case study of the Glasgow Haskell compiler provides a concrete example of functional language compilation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jeremy W. Sherman
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Henckell, Karsten

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 S55
System ID: NCFE004020:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004020/00001

Material Information

Title: Compiling Imperative and Functional Languages
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Sherman, Jeremy W.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Programming Languages
Compilers
History of Computing
Code of Optimization
Haskell, Glasgow
GHC
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Computers operate at a very low level of abstraction. People think in terms of higher-level abstractions. Programming languages let people describe a computation using higher-level abstractions in such a way that the description can be translated into something a computer can execute. This translation is performed algorithmically by a program called a compiler. This thesis looks at how a compiler carries out this translation for two very different types of programming languages, the imperative and the functional. Imperative languages reflect the concept of computation that is built into modern von Neumann computers, while functional languages conceive of computation as a process of symbolic rewriting. The functional model of computation is utterly different from the von Neumann model, but programs written in functional languages must ultimately run on von Neumann machines. The thesis focuses throughout on optimizing program representation for execution on modern von Neumann computers. A case study of the Glasgow Haskell compiler provides a concrete example of functional language compilation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jeremy W. Sherman
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Henckell, Karsten

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 S55
System ID: NCFE004020:00001

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