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The Quest to Find Utopia

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004004/00001

Material Information

Title: The Quest to Find Utopia From Thomas More to Aldous Huxley
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Riopel, Caitlin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Utopia
Ideology
Religion
Huxley, Aldous
More, Thomas
Brave New World
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In Thomas More�s Utopia (1516) and Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley, the authors grapple with the social issue of accommodating communal and individual desires. Such an idea inspires a range of questions regarding a citizen�s quality of life including how to define happiness and religion. The inherent inquiry that orbits this meditation is therefore, what does it mean to be human and how can societal organization foster these qualities? One of the main areas I focus on is the importance of ideology in defining personal and communal identity. By recognizing many of our values as constructions, the possibility for a larger conception of community becomes possible. We live in a world where the separation between the self and the other is at the crux of all conflict. If humans began to define themselves as part of a global identity, this self/other barrier might cause fewer social problems. In addition to the recognition of ideological constructions, I suggest humankind adopt a new meaning of religion that redefines our existent cultural boundaries. Both of these philosophical reconfigurations make widespread human connectivity probable. Throughout the thesis I attempt to locate the ideological values that make the societies within the texts possible. Furthermore I analyze both authors� use of religion and employ these observations in order to clarify and glorify my own definition.
Statement of Responsibility: by Caitlin Riopel
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R58
System ID: NCFE004004:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004004/00001

Material Information

Title: The Quest to Find Utopia From Thomas More to Aldous Huxley
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Riopel, Caitlin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Utopia
Ideology
Religion
Huxley, Aldous
More, Thomas
Brave New World
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In Thomas More�s Utopia (1516) and Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley, the authors grapple with the social issue of accommodating communal and individual desires. Such an idea inspires a range of questions regarding a citizen�s quality of life including how to define happiness and religion. The inherent inquiry that orbits this meditation is therefore, what does it mean to be human and how can societal organization foster these qualities? One of the main areas I focus on is the importance of ideology in defining personal and communal identity. By recognizing many of our values as constructions, the possibility for a larger conception of community becomes possible. We live in a world where the separation between the self and the other is at the crux of all conflict. If humans began to define themselves as part of a global identity, this self/other barrier might cause fewer social problems. In addition to the recognition of ideological constructions, I suggest humankind adopt a new meaning of religion that redefines our existent cultural boundaries. Both of these philosophical reconfigurations make widespread human connectivity probable. Throughout the thesis I attempt to locate the ideological values that make the societies within the texts possible. Furthermore I analyze both authors� use of religion and employ these observations in order to clarify and glorify my own definition.
Statement of Responsibility: by Caitlin Riopel
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R58
System ID: NCFE004004:00001

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