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Into Africa

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004003/00001

Material Information

Title: Into Africa A Study of Post-Conflict Democratization
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Riggs, Ceara
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Africa
Democratization
Post-Conflict
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Theories about democratization suggest that many countries in Africa are unlikely candidates for democratization because of their low levels of development and histories of conflict. Nevertheless, several countries have been able to transition to and sustain democratic governance since the end of the Cold War despite economic strain and recent episodes of serious conflict. When contrasted with instances of failed democratization, the successful cases demonstrate some important similarities that may explain their ability to sustain a democratic transition. Countries with successful transitions included all major groups in the transition process, were not dependent on international financial support to start their transitions, and ended the conflict with far-reaching negotiations and fundamental reconstruction of the government through the creation of a new constitution. In contrast, the countries with failed transitions experienced resumed conflict following questionably legitimate elections, suppression of political activity and organization, and significant military influence over government. The differences between these sets of cases highlight factors that may have strengthened the democratic transition in the successful cases. While further research is required to draw more robust conclusions about the requirements for a democratic transition after conflict, this study suggests several factors of potential significance: ensuring a transfer of power in the founding elections, developing an electoral code and generating an enforceable constitution, negotiating the transition to open the political space and allow for greater political activity, organization, and oversight, and some specific roles for international financial aid in the transition process.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ceara Riggs
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R5
System ID: NCFE004003:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004003/00001

Material Information

Title: Into Africa A Study of Post-Conflict Democratization
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Riggs, Ceara
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Africa
Democratization
Post-Conflict
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Theories about democratization suggest that many countries in Africa are unlikely candidates for democratization because of their low levels of development and histories of conflict. Nevertheless, several countries have been able to transition to and sustain democratic governance since the end of the Cold War despite economic strain and recent episodes of serious conflict. When contrasted with instances of failed democratization, the successful cases demonstrate some important similarities that may explain their ability to sustain a democratic transition. Countries with successful transitions included all major groups in the transition process, were not dependent on international financial support to start their transitions, and ended the conflict with far-reaching negotiations and fundamental reconstruction of the government through the creation of a new constitution. In contrast, the countries with failed transitions experienced resumed conflict following questionably legitimate elections, suppression of political activity and organization, and significant military influence over government. The differences between these sets of cases highlight factors that may have strengthened the democratic transition in the successful cases. While further research is required to draw more robust conclusions about the requirements for a democratic transition after conflict, this study suggests several factors of potential significance: ensuring a transfer of power in the founding elections, developing an electoral code and generating an enforceable constitution, negotiating the transition to open the political space and allow for greater political activity, organization, and oversight, and some specific roles for international financial aid in the transition process.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ceara Riggs
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R5
System ID: NCFE004003:00001

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