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Arboreal Arthropod Communities of Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) in Sarasota, Florida

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004002/00001

Material Information

Title: Arboreal Arthropod Communities of Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) in Sarasota, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Renne, Rachel Rebekah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Urban Ecology
Arboreal Arthropod
Canopy Biology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Live oak trees (Quercus virginiana P. Mill) are commonly found in urban areas in Sarasota, Florida. This study evaluated the impact of development on the arthropod communities found in these trees. Urbanization variables in the landscape were assessed at a large-scale around each tree. At a local scale, the immediate habitat of each tree was evaluated for urbanization, and the isolation of the tree was quantified. Two fly families(Dolichopodidae and Muscidae) were evaluated as indicators of urbanization. Large-scale urbanization variables were not effective predictors of arthropod diversity. The scale used in this study is probably too large to evaluate sprawling urban areas like Sarasota, and may be inappropriate for arthropods; although Dolichopodid flies were negatively correlated with large-scale impermeable surfaces. Below-canopy variables (percentage of manicured lawn) were more effective predictors of diversity. Overall, the interactions of urbanization variables with arthropod communities and diversity suggests that the level of ongoing disturbances in an area has the greatest effect on arthropods.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rachel Rebekah Renne
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R4
System ID: NCFE004002:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE004002/00001

Material Information

Title: Arboreal Arthropod Communities of Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) in Sarasota, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Renne, Rachel Rebekah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Urban Ecology
Arboreal Arthropod
Canopy Biology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Live oak trees (Quercus virginiana P. Mill) are commonly found in urban areas in Sarasota, Florida. This study evaluated the impact of development on the arthropod communities found in these trees. Urbanization variables in the landscape were assessed at a large-scale around each tree. At a local scale, the immediate habitat of each tree was evaluated for urbanization, and the isolation of the tree was quantified. Two fly families(Dolichopodidae and Muscidae) were evaluated as indicators of urbanization. Large-scale urbanization variables were not effective predictors of arthropod diversity. The scale used in this study is probably too large to evaluate sprawling urban areas like Sarasota, and may be inappropriate for arthropods; although Dolichopodid flies were negatively correlated with large-scale impermeable surfaces. Below-canopy variables (percentage of manicured lawn) were more effective predictors of diversity. Overall, the interactions of urbanization variables with arthropod communities and diversity suggests that the level of ongoing disturbances in an area has the greatest effect on arthropods.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rachel Rebekah Renne
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 R4
System ID: NCFE004002:00001

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