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The Identification of Cocaine-Induced Changes in the Human Monocyte Proteome Using Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003990/00001

Material Information

Title: The Identification of Cocaine-Induced Changes in the Human Monocyte Proteome Using Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Phillips, John W.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ICAT
Proteomics
Cocaine
Mass Spectronetry
Monocyte
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Cocaine is a widely abused drug with a broad spectrum of physiological effects. In addition to its addictive properties, cocaine has been shown to result in suppression of the immune system. In recent years, the cellular mechanisms underlying drug response and disease states have been investigated using liquid chromatography (LC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to map changes in protein expression in affected cells. A new technique, utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), allows quantitative as well as qualitative changes in protein expression to be determined by LC/MS/MS. This study sought to characterize the effects of cocaine exposure on protein expression in cultured human monocytes using these methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying cocaine-induced immunosuppression. Two proteins thought to be involved in inflammatory immune responses, pannexin 3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), showed decreases in abundance as a result of cocaine exposure. In addition, two proteins involved in protein synthesis, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2(EF-2) and a homologue of 60S ribosomal protein L12, showed decreases in abundance. These results are consistent with previous findings that cocaine causes inhibition of the inflammatory immune response. A novel mechanism for cocaine-induced immunosuppression, mediated via the antagonism of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is proposed.
Statement of Responsibility: by John W. Phillips
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Walstrom, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P55
System ID: NCFE003990:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003990/00001

Material Information

Title: The Identification of Cocaine-Induced Changes in the Human Monocyte Proteome Using Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Phillips, John W.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ICAT
Proteomics
Cocaine
Mass Spectronetry
Monocyte
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Cocaine is a widely abused drug with a broad spectrum of physiological effects. In addition to its addictive properties, cocaine has been shown to result in suppression of the immune system. In recent years, the cellular mechanisms underlying drug response and disease states have been investigated using liquid chromatography (LC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to map changes in protein expression in affected cells. A new technique, utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), allows quantitative as well as qualitative changes in protein expression to be determined by LC/MS/MS. This study sought to characterize the effects of cocaine exposure on protein expression in cultured human monocytes using these methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying cocaine-induced immunosuppression. Two proteins thought to be involved in inflammatory immune responses, pannexin 3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), showed decreases in abundance as a result of cocaine exposure. In addition, two proteins involved in protein synthesis, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2(EF-2) and a homologue of 60S ribosomal protein L12, showed decreases in abundance. These results are consistent with previous findings that cocaine causes inhibition of the inflammatory immune response. A novel mechanism for cocaine-induced immunosuppression, mediated via the antagonism of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is proposed.
Statement of Responsibility: by John W. Phillips
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Walstrom, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P55
System ID: NCFE003990:00001

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