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Civil Conflict Outcomes and Recurrence

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003986/00001

Material Information

Title: Civil Conflict Outcomes and Recurrence
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Perniciaro, Andrew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Civil War
Conflict Resolution
Conflict Recurrence
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis considers possible causes for the recurrence of civil conflicts in the period 1945 to 2006. Building on a review of literature regarding the causes and resolution of conflict, the study hypothesizes a connection between the type of outcome of a conflict and recurrence. Specifically, conflicts ending in military victories and political settlements are compared, and the connection between outcome type and recurrence is studied through a brief analysis of empirical data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program and case studies of civil conflicts in Greece, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Nigeria, Iran, and Moldova. The study finds some evidence to suggest that military victories have historically been less likely to be followed by a recurrence of conflict. However, neither cross-national results nor analysis of cases provide any definitive link between outcome and recurrence. Instead, a number of other factors including international influence, geography, and disparity of forces seem to affect conflict recurrence as much or more than the type of outcome from the previous instance of conflict.
Statement of Responsibility: by Andrew Perniciaro
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P4
System ID: NCFE003986:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003986/00001

Material Information

Title: Civil Conflict Outcomes and Recurrence
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Perniciaro, Andrew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Civil War
Conflict Resolution
Conflict Recurrence
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis considers possible causes for the recurrence of civil conflicts in the period 1945 to 2006. Building on a review of literature regarding the causes and resolution of conflict, the study hypothesizes a connection between the type of outcome of a conflict and recurrence. Specifically, conflicts ending in military victories and political settlements are compared, and the connection between outcome type and recurrence is studied through a brief analysis of empirical data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program and case studies of civil conflicts in Greece, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Nigeria, Iran, and Moldova. The study finds some evidence to suggest that military victories have historically been less likely to be followed by a recurrence of conflict. However, neither cross-national results nor analysis of cases provide any definitive link between outcome and recurrence. Instead, a number of other factors including international influence, geography, and disparity of forces seem to affect conflict recurrence as much or more than the type of outcome from the previous instance of conflict.
Statement of Responsibility: by Andrew Perniciaro
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P4
System ID: NCFE003986:00001

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