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Deconstructing Gothic Identity

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003984/00001

Material Information

Title: Deconstructing Gothic Identity
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Paterson, Amy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Goths
Jordanes
Wulfila
Ostrogoths
Gothic Language
Late Antiquity
Skeireins
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: From the third to sixth centuries the Goths were an important power in the Roman world. They participated in two of the most disastrous losses for the Roman Empire and also established two kingdoms within the empire. Historians have linked these disruptions as well as the Roman military's dependence upon Gothic recruits to the decline of the Roman Empire and the rise of medieval society. Because of the significance of the Goths' role in the late empire, we know more about them than other contemporary barbarian groups, but our sources remain few. Ancient and modern historians alike have constructed Gothic identity as fixed and separate from Roman identity, when in fact it was sometimes difficult to differentiate the two. Gothic identity should be reinterpreted in light of these difficulties. In this thesis I reassess the three major aspects of their identity � history, religion, and language � and discuss how what evidence we have concerning these aspects are problematic for determining who the Goths were. The first chapter focuses on the Gothic history of Jordanes, the second on the Gothic bishop Wulfila and the Arian religion, and the third on the Gothic language.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amy Paterson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Rohrbacher, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P29
System ID: NCFE003984:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003984/00001

Material Information

Title: Deconstructing Gothic Identity
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Paterson, Amy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Goths
Jordanes
Wulfila
Ostrogoths
Gothic Language
Late Antiquity
Skeireins
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: From the third to sixth centuries the Goths were an important power in the Roman world. They participated in two of the most disastrous losses for the Roman Empire and also established two kingdoms within the empire. Historians have linked these disruptions as well as the Roman military's dependence upon Gothic recruits to the decline of the Roman Empire and the rise of medieval society. Because of the significance of the Goths' role in the late empire, we know more about them than other contemporary barbarian groups, but our sources remain few. Ancient and modern historians alike have constructed Gothic identity as fixed and separate from Roman identity, when in fact it was sometimes difficult to differentiate the two. Gothic identity should be reinterpreted in light of these difficulties. In this thesis I reassess the three major aspects of their identity � history, religion, and language � and discuss how what evidence we have concerning these aspects are problematic for determining who the Goths were. The first chapter focuses on the Gothic history of Jordanes, the second on the Gothic bishop Wulfila and the Arian religion, and the third on the Gothic language.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amy Paterson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Rohrbacher, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 P29
System ID: NCFE003984:00001

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