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Dissonance and the Body in Contextual Atonality

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003982/00001

Material Information

Title: Dissonance and the Body in Contextual Atonality A Phenomenological Analysis
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Oberlander, Brian
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Phenomenology
Music
Schoenberg, Arnold
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project is an attempt to rethink some traditional approaches to the early atonal music of Arnold Schoenberg, looking to their implications for embodiment and listening experience. Composed during a period of roughly five years from 1908-1913, Schoenberg's "freely" or "contextually" atonal music is considered a seminal moment in the history of musical modernism, and continues to spark debates in music theory and musicology. Importantly, many of these debates seem to hinge (either implicitly or explicitly) on the music's problematic history of reception. Schoenberg himself took an active role in the shaping of this history, making consistent and outspoken attempts to link his musical innovations to the key musical conceptions which preceded them. In this way, he meant to justify the newness of his music, and in the process, to win over an often hostile audience. The project begins by articulating a prominent stance on this issue, attempting to reformulate Schoenberg's claims to historical and theoretical legitimacy via the work of Charles Rosen and Ren� Leibowitz. Having established a viable sense of connection between Schoenberg's atonal music and the tonal tradition which received it, this theoretical continuity is subjected to the terms of a phenomenological investigation, weighed against Maurice Merleau-Ponty's theory of embodied perception, and re-contextualized for its implications in a musical experience.
Statement of Responsibility: by Brian Oberlander
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Miles, Stephen; Flakne, April

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 O1
System ID: NCFE003982:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003982/00001

Material Information

Title: Dissonance and the Body in Contextual Atonality A Phenomenological Analysis
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Oberlander, Brian
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Phenomenology
Music
Schoenberg, Arnold
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project is an attempt to rethink some traditional approaches to the early atonal music of Arnold Schoenberg, looking to their implications for embodiment and listening experience. Composed during a period of roughly five years from 1908-1913, Schoenberg's "freely" or "contextually" atonal music is considered a seminal moment in the history of musical modernism, and continues to spark debates in music theory and musicology. Importantly, many of these debates seem to hinge (either implicitly or explicitly) on the music's problematic history of reception. Schoenberg himself took an active role in the shaping of this history, making consistent and outspoken attempts to link his musical innovations to the key musical conceptions which preceded them. In this way, he meant to justify the newness of his music, and in the process, to win over an often hostile audience. The project begins by articulating a prominent stance on this issue, attempting to reformulate Schoenberg's claims to historical and theoretical legitimacy via the work of Charles Rosen and Ren� Leibowitz. Having established a viable sense of connection between Schoenberg's atonal music and the tonal tradition which received it, this theoretical continuity is subjected to the terms of a phenomenological investigation, weighed against Maurice Merleau-Ponty's theory of embodied perception, and re-contextualized for its implications in a musical experience.
Statement of Responsibility: by Brian Oberlander
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Miles, Stephen; Flakne, April

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 O1
System ID: NCFE003982:00001

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