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Invasion of the Bird Snatchers

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003977/00001

Material Information

Title: Invasion of the Bird Snatchers A Historical Look at the Impact of Introduced Mammals on New Zealand's Native Avifauna
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Miller, Evan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Avifauna
New Zealand
Mammals
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: New Zealand�s geographical isolation from other landmasses created a unique avifauna on the island, avifauna that lacked many of the defense mechanisms that would make it possible for them to survive attack by ground predators. After human colonization, including Maori and European settlement, various exotic mammals were introduced to the land. Following the introduction of mammals that were able to establish themselves in New Zealand, 48% of all native birds have become extinct, primarily due to predation by exotic species. Past research has identified Brushtail possums, rats, stoats, and feral animals such as housecats as the primary predators of native birds in New Zealand. All previously named species prey on birds, including chicks, ground nests, and in some cases, adult birds. Species such as brushtail possums also compete with avifauna for available resources. The history of conservation in New Zealand started quite early, with the concern for native species beginning in the late 1800�s. Today, the Department of Conservation is responsible for management of all endemic bird life and management of various exotic threats. Management tools include poisons, traps, hunting, and other methods for reducing threat numbers. The DOC manages endemic birdlife on offshore islands and on the mainland using secluded reserves that undergo ongoing maintenance. The efforts of the DOC and the work of New Zealand citizens has saved many endemic birds on the brink of extinction.
Statement of Responsibility: by Evan Miller
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 M64
System ID: NCFE003977:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003977/00001

Material Information

Title: Invasion of the Bird Snatchers A Historical Look at the Impact of Introduced Mammals on New Zealand's Native Avifauna
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Miller, Evan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Avifauna
New Zealand
Mammals
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: New Zealand�s geographical isolation from other landmasses created a unique avifauna on the island, avifauna that lacked many of the defense mechanisms that would make it possible for them to survive attack by ground predators. After human colonization, including Maori and European settlement, various exotic mammals were introduced to the land. Following the introduction of mammals that were able to establish themselves in New Zealand, 48% of all native birds have become extinct, primarily due to predation by exotic species. Past research has identified Brushtail possums, rats, stoats, and feral animals such as housecats as the primary predators of native birds in New Zealand. All previously named species prey on birds, including chicks, ground nests, and in some cases, adult birds. Species such as brushtail possums also compete with avifauna for available resources. The history of conservation in New Zealand started quite early, with the concern for native species beginning in the late 1800�s. Today, the Department of Conservation is responsible for management of all endemic bird life and management of various exotic threats. Management tools include poisons, traps, hunting, and other methods for reducing threat numbers. The DOC manages endemic birdlife on offshore islands and on the mainland using secluded reserves that undergo ongoing maintenance. The efforts of the DOC and the work of New Zealand citizens has saved many endemic birds on the brink of extinction.
Statement of Responsibility: by Evan Miller
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 M64
System ID: NCFE003977:00001

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