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Anthropology and Phenomenology of Birth

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003975/00001

Material Information

Title: Anthropology and Phenomenology of Birth
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Michelsen, Claire
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Midwifery
Phenomenology
Ethnography
Birth
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis intends to supplement an ethnographic portrayal of a free-standing birthing home with a phenomenological discussion of what it means for birth to be an intersubjective event. Combining writing from Michael Jackson, Francoise Dastur, and Maurice Medeau-Ponty articulates how intersubjectivity was integral to creating the event of birth at the birthing home. Intersubjective engagement allowed individuals to construct their birth experiences both before and after they occurred. The disclosure of personal stories, advice, and simple information shaped how clients viewed their pregnancies, births and parenting choices. Clients' birth narratives and anticipations were staged in terms that can best be understood as existential: navigating the birth process which ultimately lay outside of their control, and yet which they could, and hoped to, alter and guide. As Melissa Cheyney has written, out-of-hospital birthers responded to a larger context in which out-of-hospital birth was challenged, portrayed as unsafe and/or as abnormal. Clients anticipated their births and retold their narratives, in order to decenter questions about 'what if something goes wrong' and to retell the experience as a safe, natural and fulfilling process, over which they had influence.
Statement of Responsibility: by Claire Michelsen
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Vesperi, Maria; Flakne, April

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 20008 M6
System ID: NCFE003975:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003975/00001

Material Information

Title: Anthropology and Phenomenology of Birth
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Michelsen, Claire
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Midwifery
Phenomenology
Ethnography
Birth
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis intends to supplement an ethnographic portrayal of a free-standing birthing home with a phenomenological discussion of what it means for birth to be an intersubjective event. Combining writing from Michael Jackson, Francoise Dastur, and Maurice Medeau-Ponty articulates how intersubjectivity was integral to creating the event of birth at the birthing home. Intersubjective engagement allowed individuals to construct their birth experiences both before and after they occurred. The disclosure of personal stories, advice, and simple information shaped how clients viewed their pregnancies, births and parenting choices. Clients' birth narratives and anticipations were staged in terms that can best be understood as existential: navigating the birth process which ultimately lay outside of their control, and yet which they could, and hoped to, alter and guide. As Melissa Cheyney has written, out-of-hospital birthers responded to a larger context in which out-of-hospital birth was challenged, portrayed as unsafe and/or as abnormal. Clients anticipated their births and retold their narratives, in order to decenter questions about 'what if something goes wrong' and to retell the experience as a safe, natural and fulfilling process, over which they had influence.
Statement of Responsibility: by Claire Michelsen
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Vesperi, Maria; Flakne, April

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 20008 M6
System ID: NCFE003975:00001

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