ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/header_item.html)

Effects of Herbivory on Species Invasions

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003958/00001

Material Information

Title: Effects of Herbivory on Species Invasions A Study of Local Invasive Species in Sarasota, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lawton, Christopher J.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Invasive Plant Species
Herbivory
Species Invasion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Invasive species are rapidly becoming one of the biggest environmental problems in the United States, costing an estimated $137 billion annually to mitigate. Sarasota is a microcosm of the larger challenges of invasive species in the United States. Plants are one branch of the invasive species problem. Herbivores are limiting factors in plant growth, survival and reproduction. Therefore, I conducted a study of herbivory on invasive species found in Sarasota. I hypothesized that Dioscorea bulbifera, Schinus terebinthifolius, Bauhinia variegate and Cupaniopsis anacardioides, recent invasive plants in Sarasota County, would have little or no herbivory due to a lag time for insect colonization. I measured herbivory on all four species though a field study and greenhouse experiment specifically on D. bulbifera. A herbivory field study of the four species was undertaken during the spring of 2006, whereby herbivory was measured at two different sites in Sarasota County: the Carlton Preserve and New College of Florida. A greenhouse experiment was conducted during the fall and spring of 2006/2007, to quantify the impact of different levels of herbivory on growth rates of D. bulbifera. Results showed that my hypothesis was correct in that herbivores had not colonized invasive plants in the areas.
Statement of Responsibility: by Christopher J. Lawton
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 L4
System ID: NCFE003958:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003958/00001

Material Information

Title: Effects of Herbivory on Species Invasions A Study of Local Invasive Species in Sarasota, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lawton, Christopher J.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Invasive Plant Species
Herbivory
Species Invasion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Invasive species are rapidly becoming one of the biggest environmental problems in the United States, costing an estimated $137 billion annually to mitigate. Sarasota is a microcosm of the larger challenges of invasive species in the United States. Plants are one branch of the invasive species problem. Herbivores are limiting factors in plant growth, survival and reproduction. Therefore, I conducted a study of herbivory on invasive species found in Sarasota. I hypothesized that Dioscorea bulbifera, Schinus terebinthifolius, Bauhinia variegate and Cupaniopsis anacardioides, recent invasive plants in Sarasota County, would have little or no herbivory due to a lag time for insect colonization. I measured herbivory on all four species though a field study and greenhouse experiment specifically on D. bulbifera. A herbivory field study of the four species was undertaken during the spring of 2006, whereby herbivory was measured at two different sites in Sarasota County: the Carlton Preserve and New College of Florida. A greenhouse experiment was conducted during the fall and spring of 2006/2007, to quantify the impact of different levels of herbivory on growth rates of D. bulbifera. Results showed that my hypothesis was correct in that herbivores had not colonized invasive plants in the areas.
Statement of Responsibility: by Christopher J. Lawton
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 L4
System ID: NCFE003958:00001

ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/footer_item.html)