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Water Bear, Water Bear, What Do You See?

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003945/00001

Material Information

Title: Water Bear, Water Bear, What Do You See? The Implementation of Tardigrades as a Means to a More Inclucive Science Experience
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jones, Charissa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Environmental Education
Tardigrade
K-12
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Environmental Education is of the utmost importance to ensure an ecologically literate population who will have the tools necessary to conserve and protect the world's natural resources. We are told to "think globally and act locally" and yet few can describe aspects of local ecosystems with as much fervor and enthusiasm as they can an exotic environment, such as tropical rainforests with their rich diversity of flora and fauna. Many K -12 students never learn to appreciate their local ecosystems(Louv, 2006). I designed an environmental education program using tardigrades to foster a desire to learn about the local environment and to increase the students' awareness of their local biodiversity. One hypothesis is that microorganisms can foster excitement and learning about local ecology for schoolchildren, just as effectively as programs that generally deal with charismatic megafauna (larger animals that can be considered cute and cuddly). Using smaller, cryptic organisms represents a different approach to learning about ecology. The personal connection with a specific organism and/or natural setting encourages students to value natural ecosystems long after they move on (Louv, 2006). I also hypothesized that a unit could be created that would be easily implemented in schools regardless of the monetary assets or time restraints. The result of the program is elementary school children who enjoy hands-on experiences with nature, develop an affinity for the natural world, and improve in their observational skills. The students learned from the tardigrade science unit, and were enthusiastic to discover them in the field. Hands-on ecology inspires students to enjoy nature study, can help them develop respect for the natural world, and carry with them the specific knowledge upon which to become better stewards of the earth's ecosystems. A continuation of the pilot study would include more time spent outside as well as hands-on experiences. The advantage to the teachers includes the utilization of a low maintenance and very charismatic organism that is easy to manipulate to discuss ecology with students.
Statement of Responsibility: by Charissa Jones
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 J7
System ID: NCFE003945:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003945/00001

Material Information

Title: Water Bear, Water Bear, What Do You See? The Implementation of Tardigrades as a Means to a More Inclucive Science Experience
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jones, Charissa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Environmental Education
Tardigrade
K-12
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Environmental Education is of the utmost importance to ensure an ecologically literate population who will have the tools necessary to conserve and protect the world's natural resources. We are told to "think globally and act locally" and yet few can describe aspects of local ecosystems with as much fervor and enthusiasm as they can an exotic environment, such as tropical rainforests with their rich diversity of flora and fauna. Many K -12 students never learn to appreciate their local ecosystems(Louv, 2006). I designed an environmental education program using tardigrades to foster a desire to learn about the local environment and to increase the students' awareness of their local biodiversity. One hypothesis is that microorganisms can foster excitement and learning about local ecology for schoolchildren, just as effectively as programs that generally deal with charismatic megafauna (larger animals that can be considered cute and cuddly). Using smaller, cryptic organisms represents a different approach to learning about ecology. The personal connection with a specific organism and/or natural setting encourages students to value natural ecosystems long after they move on (Louv, 2006). I also hypothesized that a unit could be created that would be easily implemented in schools regardless of the monetary assets or time restraints. The result of the program is elementary school children who enjoy hands-on experiences with nature, develop an affinity for the natural world, and improve in their observational skills. The students learned from the tardigrade science unit, and were enthusiastic to discover them in the field. Hands-on ecology inspires students to enjoy nature study, can help them develop respect for the natural world, and carry with them the specific knowledge upon which to become better stewards of the earth's ecosystems. A continuation of the pilot study would include more time spent outside as well as hands-on experiences. The advantage to the teachers includes the utilization of a low maintenance and very charismatic organism that is easy to manipulate to discuss ecology with students.
Statement of Responsibility: by Charissa Jones
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 J7
System ID: NCFE003945:00001

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