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The Cathedral in the Desert

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003939/00001

Material Information

Title: The Cathedral in the Desert Land Use, Ethics and the Damming of Glen Canyon
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hauck, Daniel
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Land Use
Environmental Ethic
Public Policy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project looks beyond customary the archaeological, political, geological, or sentimental analyses of Glen Canyon and the Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP) to examine the implicit ethical arguments mobilized by the actors to justify and explicate their positions. The ethical frameworks of Mill (Utilitarianism) and Sagoff (Cost Benefit Analysis) are utilized to illuminate the ethical orientations and cultural frameworks manifested themselves in the land use debates over Glen Canyon. Within the American cultural constructs of nature, these frameworks are part of the "cultural toolkit," or range of culturally acceptable possibilities available to mobilize actors and morally justify their decisions. The outcome of this study is two-fold. First is an understanding of the ways that the environmental ethics embedded in American culture have limited the ability to pursue consistent policies with regard to land use, preservation of natural areas, and conservation of natural resources. Second, in the terms of this case study, it questions the value sentimental attachment had in the Utilitarian ethic used in the debates and demonstrates how the emotional attachment to Glen Canyon and its subsequent loss spawned new ethical frameworks to attempt to more fully include nature and sentimental attachment to it.
Statement of Responsibility: by Daniel Hauck
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 H3
System ID: NCFE003939:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003939/00001

Material Information

Title: The Cathedral in the Desert Land Use, Ethics and the Damming of Glen Canyon
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hauck, Daniel
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Land Use
Environmental Ethic
Public Policy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project looks beyond customary the archaeological, political, geological, or sentimental analyses of Glen Canyon and the Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP) to examine the implicit ethical arguments mobilized by the actors to justify and explicate their positions. The ethical frameworks of Mill (Utilitarianism) and Sagoff (Cost Benefit Analysis) are utilized to illuminate the ethical orientations and cultural frameworks manifested themselves in the land use debates over Glen Canyon. Within the American cultural constructs of nature, these frameworks are part of the "cultural toolkit," or range of culturally acceptable possibilities available to mobilize actors and morally justify their decisions. The outcome of this study is two-fold. First is an understanding of the ways that the environmental ethics embedded in American culture have limited the ability to pursue consistent policies with regard to land use, preservation of natural areas, and conservation of natural resources. Second, in the terms of this case study, it questions the value sentimental attachment had in the Utilitarian ethic used in the debates and demonstrates how the emotional attachment to Glen Canyon and its subsequent loss spawned new ethical frameworks to attempt to more fully include nature and sentimental attachment to it.
Statement of Responsibility: by Daniel Hauck
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 H3
System ID: NCFE003939:00001

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