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Evaluating a Cultural Theory

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003938/00001

Material Information

Title: Evaluating a Cultural Theory Correspondence Bias Among Hispanic Americans
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Harrington, Jesse
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Hispanic
Correspondence Bias
Cross-Cultural
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Previous researchers have found the correspondence bias and dispositional explanations of behavior to be weaker among individuals from collectivistic cultures when situational constraints on behavior are salient. This is due to interdependent views of the self in collectivist cultures. However, these studies have focused primarily on East Asian cultural groups. The methods of Miyamoto and Kitayama (2002) were replicated to explore patterns and possible mediation of the correspondence bias among Hispanic Americans, who are commonly considered a collectivist cultural group. Associated characteristics such as attitudes toward family, self-construal, and acculturation were assessed using the Familism Scale, Self-Construal Scale, and Stephenson Multigroup Acculturation Scale. All Hispanic participants were highly immersed into Anglo American culture, though some were biculturals who were also high in Hispanic cultural immersion. It was found that bicultural Hispanics high in both Hispanic and Anglo American cultural immersion, as well as assimilated Hispanics exhibited the correspondence bias. Unexpectedly, bicultural Hispanics exhibited a higher independent self-construal than either White Americans or assimilated Hispanics, and these three groups did not differ in interdependent self-construal. Finally, familism was found to be a core Hispanic cultural value. However, it was associated with both independent and interdependent self-construals, suggesting that familism is more than merely a collectivist value. Implications are discussed within.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jesse Harrington
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Callahan, Charlene

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 H29
System ID: NCFE003938:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003938/00001

Material Information

Title: Evaluating a Cultural Theory Correspondence Bias Among Hispanic Americans
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Harrington, Jesse
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Hispanic
Correspondence Bias
Cross-Cultural
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Previous researchers have found the correspondence bias and dispositional explanations of behavior to be weaker among individuals from collectivistic cultures when situational constraints on behavior are salient. This is due to interdependent views of the self in collectivist cultures. However, these studies have focused primarily on East Asian cultural groups. The methods of Miyamoto and Kitayama (2002) were replicated to explore patterns and possible mediation of the correspondence bias among Hispanic Americans, who are commonly considered a collectivist cultural group. Associated characteristics such as attitudes toward family, self-construal, and acculturation were assessed using the Familism Scale, Self-Construal Scale, and Stephenson Multigroup Acculturation Scale. All Hispanic participants were highly immersed into Anglo American culture, though some were biculturals who were also high in Hispanic cultural immersion. It was found that bicultural Hispanics high in both Hispanic and Anglo American cultural immersion, as well as assimilated Hispanics exhibited the correspondence bias. Unexpectedly, bicultural Hispanics exhibited a higher independent self-construal than either White Americans or assimilated Hispanics, and these three groups did not differ in interdependent self-construal. Finally, familism was found to be a core Hispanic cultural value. However, it was associated with both independent and interdependent self-construals, suggesting that familism is more than merely a collectivist value. Implications are discussed within.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jesse Harrington
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Callahan, Charlene

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 H29
System ID: NCFE003938:00001

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