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Representations of Racial Identity in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003926/00001

Material Information

Title: Representations of Racial Identity in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Geraghty, Patrick
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Oroonoko
Equiano, Olaudah
Behn, Aphra
Abolition
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative belong to the same lineage of abolitionist thought. Behn's novel, published in 1688, can be seen as the origin of abolitionist discourse. Equiano's 1789 Narrative builds on the ground Behn helped lay, showing one hundred years of development of both the slave trade and the idea of race-based thinking. A key to understanding the way these texts function as abolitionist works lies in understanding their main characters' relationship to the developing idea of "blackness" as a race-identity. In Oroonoko, the issue is complicated by Behn's entrance into the text as narrator and character, and the text's status as a work of fiction. Because of this, Oroonoko must be examined as a work of both history and literature, meaning that Behn's motivation for and execution of the story must be examined. Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative is also complicated by fiction, as evidence exists to suggest that the story he provides of his African birth is untrue. Equiano's Narrative can be viewed as a consciously manipulated effort to gain support for the abolitionist cause, which has become an important social and political issue in the hundred years between Behn and Equiano.
Statement of Responsibility: by Patrick Geraghty
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 G38
System ID: NCFE003926:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003926/00001

Material Information

Title: Representations of Racial Identity in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Geraghty, Patrick
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Oroonoko
Equiano, Olaudah
Behn, Aphra
Abolition
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative belong to the same lineage of abolitionist thought. Behn's novel, published in 1688, can be seen as the origin of abolitionist discourse. Equiano's 1789 Narrative builds on the ground Behn helped lay, showing one hundred years of development of both the slave trade and the idea of race-based thinking. A key to understanding the way these texts function as abolitionist works lies in understanding their main characters' relationship to the developing idea of "blackness" as a race-identity. In Oroonoko, the issue is complicated by Behn's entrance into the text as narrator and character, and the text's status as a work of fiction. Because of this, Oroonoko must be examined as a work of both history and literature, meaning that Behn's motivation for and execution of the story must be examined. Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative is also complicated by fiction, as evidence exists to suggest that the story he provides of his African birth is untrue. Equiano's Narrative can be viewed as a consciously manipulated effort to gain support for the abolitionist cause, which has become an important social and political issue in the hundred years between Behn and Equiano.
Statement of Responsibility: by Patrick Geraghty
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 G38
System ID: NCFE003926:00001

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