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"As You Look Closer You Notice"

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003922/00001

Material Information

Title: "As You Look Closer You Notice" Ekphrasis in Three Ancient Greek Novels
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Frazier, Annie E.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Ekphrasis
Greek
Novel
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Ancient Greek novels are prose narratives that vary in sophistication and style, and mark the birth of a genre that flourishes to this day. Ekphrasis is verbal representation of visual art. This thesis explores the use of ekphrasis in Achilles Tatius' Leukippe and Kleitophon, Longus' Daphnis and Chloe, and Heliodorus' Aethiopica. The introduction describes the genre, summarizes modern ekphrastic theory, and offers an amended definition of ekphrasis. The first chapter focuses on Achilles Tatius' ekphrastic prologue, pointing to his innovative treatment of interpretation, sight, and authorial control. The second chapter examines the appearance of ekphrases throughout the novel, arguing that they introduce ideas about the nature of representation and elicit the reader's interpretation. The third chapter investigates the use of ekphrasis in Longus' and Heliodorus' novels, suggesting that each develops his own representational technique, and that ekphrasis gives a striking voice to complex issues of narrative and description. I conclude that the novelists use ekphrasis to invite the reader's interpretation, and suggest that readers accept that invitation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Annie E. Frazier
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Rohrbacher, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F84
System ID: NCFE003922:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003922/00001

Material Information

Title: "As You Look Closer You Notice" Ekphrasis in Three Ancient Greek Novels
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Frazier, Annie E.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Ekphrasis
Greek
Novel
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Ancient Greek novels are prose narratives that vary in sophistication and style, and mark the birth of a genre that flourishes to this day. Ekphrasis is verbal representation of visual art. This thesis explores the use of ekphrasis in Achilles Tatius' Leukippe and Kleitophon, Longus' Daphnis and Chloe, and Heliodorus' Aethiopica. The introduction describes the genre, summarizes modern ekphrastic theory, and offers an amended definition of ekphrasis. The first chapter focuses on Achilles Tatius' ekphrastic prologue, pointing to his innovative treatment of interpretation, sight, and authorial control. The second chapter examines the appearance of ekphrases throughout the novel, arguing that they introduce ideas about the nature of representation and elicit the reader's interpretation. The third chapter investigates the use of ekphrasis in Longus' and Heliodorus' novels, suggesting that each develops his own representational technique, and that ekphrasis gives a striking voice to complex issues of narrative and description. I conclude that the novelists use ekphrasis to invite the reader's interpretation, and suggest that readers accept that invitation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Annie E. Frazier
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Rohrbacher, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F84
System ID: NCFE003922:00001

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