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New Prophecy, New Orthodoxy

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003921/00001

Material Information

Title: New Prophecy, New Orthodoxy The Evolution of Early Christian Authority in Second Century Asia Minor
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Francis, Samyntha Kay
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Montanism
New Prophecy
Orthodoxy
Heresy
Urban Christianity
Rural Christianity
Revelation of John
Ecstatic Prophecy
Asia Minor
Phrygia
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In the late second century, urban Christianies began to institutionalize and form an orthodox authority through a monarchical episcopate; however, not all Christianies gave authority to the bishop but rather favored their own traditions of leadership. The early New Prophecy movement, originating in Phrygia (Asia Minor), developed out of a rural culture that favored prophecy and millenarianism while the emerging orthodoxy developed more out of urban areas. The orthodoxy favored placing authority in monarchical leadership of bishops rather than charismatic prophets. The original New Prophecy movement challenged the authority of the episcopal leadership of the forming orthodoxy by enacting practices and prophesies inspired by an intended revivalism of the original Jesus movement that included a strong sense of millenarianism and eschatological expectations. This initial conflict of authority caused the New Prophecy to be labeled a heresy decades later by a more solidified and powerful orthodoxy. I introduce the locational context of the original Montanists detailing how their rural, Phrygian roots fostered chiliasm through revivalism and charismatic prophecy, which shows the initial conflict of authority and regional misunderstandings the Montanist had with an institutionalizing orthodoxy. This geographical context continues to influence the early Montanists by evidence of Ignatius' Letters and the Apocalypse of John. Primarily, however, the form of prophecy and the practices enacted by the authority of those prophecies caused the conflict between the forming orthodoxy.
Statement of Responsibility: by Samyntha Kay Francis
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Marks, Susan

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F8
System ID: NCFE003921:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003921/00001

Material Information

Title: New Prophecy, New Orthodoxy The Evolution of Early Christian Authority in Second Century Asia Minor
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Francis, Samyntha Kay
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Montanism
New Prophecy
Orthodoxy
Heresy
Urban Christianity
Rural Christianity
Revelation of John
Ecstatic Prophecy
Asia Minor
Phrygia
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In the late second century, urban Christianies began to institutionalize and form an orthodox authority through a monarchical episcopate; however, not all Christianies gave authority to the bishop but rather favored their own traditions of leadership. The early New Prophecy movement, originating in Phrygia (Asia Minor), developed out of a rural culture that favored prophecy and millenarianism while the emerging orthodoxy developed more out of urban areas. The orthodoxy favored placing authority in monarchical leadership of bishops rather than charismatic prophets. The original New Prophecy movement challenged the authority of the episcopal leadership of the forming orthodoxy by enacting practices and prophesies inspired by an intended revivalism of the original Jesus movement that included a strong sense of millenarianism and eschatological expectations. This initial conflict of authority caused the New Prophecy to be labeled a heresy decades later by a more solidified and powerful orthodoxy. I introduce the locational context of the original Montanists detailing how their rural, Phrygian roots fostered chiliasm through revivalism and charismatic prophecy, which shows the initial conflict of authority and regional misunderstandings the Montanist had with an institutionalizing orthodoxy. This geographical context continues to influence the early Montanists by evidence of Ignatius' Letters and the Apocalypse of John. Primarily, however, the form of prophecy and the practices enacted by the authority of those prophecies caused the conflict between the forming orthodoxy.
Statement of Responsibility: by Samyntha Kay Francis
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Marks, Susan

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F8
System ID: NCFE003921:00001

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