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Nuclear Nation

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003917/00001

Material Information

Title: Nuclear Nation The Full Cost of Electricity in the United States
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Fink, John
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nuclear
Power
Full Cost
Cost
Coal
External
Externalities
Energy
Uranium
Fink, John
Young, Patrick
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The United States requires energy to support its economy and way of life. Our current sources of energy are becoming increasingly untenable because of problems with supplies including depletion of our own resources and hence dependence upon foreign sources, rising prices and environmental issues including concerns over global warming. This paper computes the full costs of electrical power generation from each source, including health and environmental costs. Oil and natural gas are depleting resources with rapidly rising prices, uncertain supplies and significant environmental costs. Wind and hydro-electric are so constrained by geography that they can only make minor contributions to our future energy needs. Solar power is very costly due to the initial investment required, and is also so diffuse that it can only meet low-intensity needs. Coal has tremendous environmental costs. However, nuclear power utilizes an inexpensive and plentiful fuel source, initial investment has become competitive, and its environmental impact is lower than any power source other than solar. Thus, nuclear power is the logical choice for future generation of electricity. Encouraging nuclear power does not require any special subsidies, but only requires that the market price of electrical generation for each source reflects their true cost. The suggested method of internalizing these external costs is through the implementation of a carbon tax.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Fink
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F4
System ID: NCFE003917:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003917/00001

Material Information

Title: Nuclear Nation The Full Cost of Electricity in the United States
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Fink, John
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nuclear
Power
Full Cost
Cost
Coal
External
Externalities
Energy
Uranium
Fink, John
Young, Patrick
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The United States requires energy to support its economy and way of life. Our current sources of energy are becoming increasingly untenable because of problems with supplies including depletion of our own resources and hence dependence upon foreign sources, rising prices and environmental issues including concerns over global warming. This paper computes the full costs of electrical power generation from each source, including health and environmental costs. Oil and natural gas are depleting resources with rapidly rising prices, uncertain supplies and significant environmental costs. Wind and hydro-electric are so constrained by geography that they can only make minor contributions to our future energy needs. Solar power is very costly due to the initial investment required, and is also so diffuse that it can only meet low-intensity needs. Coal has tremendous environmental costs. However, nuclear power utilizes an inexpensive and plentiful fuel source, initial investment has become competitive, and its environmental impact is lower than any power source other than solar. Thus, nuclear power is the logical choice for future generation of electricity. Encouraging nuclear power does not require any special subsidies, but only requires that the market price of electrical generation for each source reflects their true cost. The suggested method of internalizing these external costs is through the implementation of a carbon tax.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Fink
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 F4
System ID: NCFE003917:00001

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