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Analysis of the Dutch Disease in Russian Economy

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003908/00001

Material Information

Title: Analysis of the Dutch Disease in Russian Economy
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Dubrovsky, Dmitriy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dutch Disease
Russian Federation
Manufacturing Sector
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Russia has an abundance of natural resources, most notably oil. The question addressed in this thesis is whether this abundance has resulted in Russia experiencing the natural resource curse, often referred to as the Dutch Disease. The Dutch Disease occurs when an abundance of natural resources results in negative economic growth. This phenomenon has been attributed to three factors: 1. Sudden find of natural resources places the traditional manufacturing sector under pressure and this pressure results in de-industrialization of the sector via outflow of labor and capital. 2. Natural-resource-rich economies seem especially prone to socially damaging rent-seeking behavior in a form of corruption that affects business and government, thereby distorting the allocation of resources and reducing both economic efficiency and social equity. 3. Nations that are confident that their natural resources are their most important asset may inadvertently, and perhaps even deliberately, neglect the development of their human resources by devoting inadequate attention and expenditure to education. Based on these criteria, Russia has a clear case of early Dutch Disease where its manufacturing base is slowly deteriorating, while resource extraction sector is expanding; corruption levels have undermined entrepreneurial activity; education system lacks funding and clear agenda. Necessary measures have to be taken immediately to prevent the country from contracting a full-blown Dutch Disease.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dmitriy Dubrovsky
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 D8
System ID: NCFE003908:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003908/00001

Material Information

Title: Analysis of the Dutch Disease in Russian Economy
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Dubrovsky, Dmitriy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dutch Disease
Russian Federation
Manufacturing Sector
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Russia has an abundance of natural resources, most notably oil. The question addressed in this thesis is whether this abundance has resulted in Russia experiencing the natural resource curse, often referred to as the Dutch Disease. The Dutch Disease occurs when an abundance of natural resources results in negative economic growth. This phenomenon has been attributed to three factors: 1. Sudden find of natural resources places the traditional manufacturing sector under pressure and this pressure results in de-industrialization of the sector via outflow of labor and capital. 2. Natural-resource-rich economies seem especially prone to socially damaging rent-seeking behavior in a form of corruption that affects business and government, thereby distorting the allocation of resources and reducing both economic efficiency and social equity. 3. Nations that are confident that their natural resources are their most important asset may inadvertently, and perhaps even deliberately, neglect the development of their human resources by devoting inadequate attention and expenditure to education. Based on these criteria, Russia has a clear case of early Dutch Disease where its manufacturing base is slowly deteriorating, while resource extraction sector is expanding; corruption levels have undermined entrepreneurial activity; education system lacks funding and clear agenda. Necessary measures have to be taken immediately to prevent the country from contracting a full-blown Dutch Disease.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dmitriy Dubrovsky
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 D8
System ID: NCFE003908:00001

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