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Uptake and Degradation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) Using Sesbania Exaltata

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003893/00001

Material Information

Title: Uptake and Degradation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) Using Sesbania Exaltata An Analysis of a Wetland Plant and Its Potential Role in Constructed Wetlands
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Butler, Jonah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Phytoremediation
Clorinated Ethenes
Wetlands
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Trichloroethylene (TCE), a suspect carcinogen, is the most common organic groundwater and soil pollutant in the United States. Ecological methods of water treatment have shown to yield adequate pollutant removal and provide an alternative to both conventional remediation techniques which are energy intensive and provide no secondary benefits such as semi natural-ecosystems. In this thesis I explore water contaminated with TCE and how (constructed) wetlands degrade TCE through different biochemical and physical processes. As a hypothetical design of a constructed wetland system, I would suggest that an anaerobic digester could be built on-site to be an additional source of both methanogenic bacteria and methane gas; these additions should help in the degradation process. This study looked at the uptake and degradation of TCE using Sesbania exaltata, an annual (or short-lived perennial), herbaceous, semiaquatic plant. Reviewed literature has neglected to establish the role of plants in the phytodegradation process for treatment wetlands; this study should help to bridge this gap of knowledge on the degradation of TCE due to wetland plants. Sesbania exaltata did take up TCE and degrade it into the metabolite trichloroacetic acid. The highest concentration of this metabolite was found in the leaves; this observation has been made in woody plants (in other studies). TCE concentrations were found in highest concentrations in the roots. Sesbania exaltata showed excellent health during the dosing period in concentrations of 100ppm, it was able to uptake and degrade TCE and may have a promising future in the use of constructed treatment wetlands.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jonah Butler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Gilchrist, Sandra

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 B98
System ID: NCFE003893:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003893/00001

Material Information

Title: Uptake and Degradation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) Using Sesbania Exaltata An Analysis of a Wetland Plant and Its Potential Role in Constructed Wetlands
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Butler, Jonah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Phytoremediation
Clorinated Ethenes
Wetlands
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Trichloroethylene (TCE), a suspect carcinogen, is the most common organic groundwater and soil pollutant in the United States. Ecological methods of water treatment have shown to yield adequate pollutant removal and provide an alternative to both conventional remediation techniques which are energy intensive and provide no secondary benefits such as semi natural-ecosystems. In this thesis I explore water contaminated with TCE and how (constructed) wetlands degrade TCE through different biochemical and physical processes. As a hypothetical design of a constructed wetland system, I would suggest that an anaerobic digester could be built on-site to be an additional source of both methanogenic bacteria and methane gas; these additions should help in the degradation process. This study looked at the uptake and degradation of TCE using Sesbania exaltata, an annual (or short-lived perennial), herbaceous, semiaquatic plant. Reviewed literature has neglected to establish the role of plants in the phytodegradation process for treatment wetlands; this study should help to bridge this gap of knowledge on the degradation of TCE due to wetland plants. Sesbania exaltata did take up TCE and degrade it into the metabolite trichloroacetic acid. The highest concentration of this metabolite was found in the leaves; this observation has been made in woody plants (in other studies). TCE concentrations were found in highest concentrations in the roots. Sesbania exaltata showed excellent health during the dosing period in concentrations of 100ppm, it was able to uptake and degrade TCE and may have a promising future in the use of constructed treatment wetlands.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jonah Butler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Gilchrist, Sandra

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 B98
System ID: NCFE003893:00001

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