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Don't Think Before You Act

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003879/00001

Material Information

Title: Don't Think Before You Act The Concious Reconsideration Model
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Andrews, Amber L.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Unconcious Processing
Cognitive Processing
Incubation
Unconscious Thought
Decision Making
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Recent studies by Dijksterhuis and colleagues suggest that unconscious thought outperforms conscious thought in cases in which information overloads working memory. The present study explores an original hypothesis, termed the Conscious Reconsideration Model, which suggests that people are capable of forming accurate implicit impressions of incoming information (as found in research on impression formation), but attempting consciously to justify such impressions can lead to counterproductive reconsideration based on details that are consciously remembered and easily verbalized. One hundred twenty male college students read a total of 48 sentences describing 4 cars along 12 attributes. Prior to reading the sentences, half of the participants were instructed to form an impression of the cars, whereas the other half were asked to read the sentences carefully. Participants were assigned to 1 of 3 thought conditions: conscious, unconscious, or no thought. Following the thought manipulation, all participants rated their attitudes toward the cars. Participants in all conditions rated the car with the greatest number of positive attributes significantly higher than the other cars. Condition groups did not differ. Participants in all groups may have formed impressions automatically and engaged in conscious reconsideration due to unlimited time allowed during attitude rating.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amber L. Andrews
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 A56
System ID: NCFE003879:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003879/00001

Material Information

Title: Don't Think Before You Act The Concious Reconsideration Model
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Andrews, Amber L.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2008
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Unconcious Processing
Cognitive Processing
Incubation
Unconscious Thought
Decision Making
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Recent studies by Dijksterhuis and colleagues suggest that unconscious thought outperforms conscious thought in cases in which information overloads working memory. The present study explores an original hypothesis, termed the Conscious Reconsideration Model, which suggests that people are capable of forming accurate implicit impressions of incoming information (as found in research on impression formation), but attempting consciously to justify such impressions can lead to counterproductive reconsideration based on details that are consciously remembered and easily verbalized. One hundred twenty male college students read a total of 48 sentences describing 4 cars along 12 attributes. Prior to reading the sentences, half of the participants were instructed to form an impression of the cars, whereas the other half were asked to read the sentences carefully. Participants were assigned to 1 of 3 thought conditions: conscious, unconscious, or no thought. Following the thought manipulation, all participants rated their attitudes toward the cars. Participants in all conditions rated the car with the greatest number of positive attributes significantly higher than the other cars. Condition groups did not differ. Participants in all groups may have formed impressions automatically and engaged in conscious reconsideration due to unlimited time allowed during attitude rating.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amber L. Andrews
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2008
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2008 A56
System ID: NCFE003879:00001

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