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Love's Ethics

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003844/00001

Material Information

Title: Love's Ethics Love as a Legitimate Moral Relation between Persons
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Schuler, Matthew M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Love
Ethics
Morality
Emotion
God
Favoritism
Kant, Immanuel
Sartre, Jean-Paul
Frankfurt, Harry G.
Buber, Martin
Solomon, Robert C.
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis is about love. In the first chapter I attempt to determine what love is and what it is not. In the course of this investigation I address other seminal issues in the philosophy of love, such as the question of whether love involves free choice. I conclude that love--in the complete sense--is a reciprocal relation, springing from a choice, embedded in an attitude, and evidenced by characteristic emotions; importantly, it has as its source a deep and intimate form of knowledge. In the second chapter I bring this definition to bear on several varieties of love, with the hope that some insight will be attained as to which of the phenomena we typically refer to as "love" can be properly so called. The conclusion I draw is that only love between human persons ought to be called "complete." In the third chapter I develop a view of ethics that can accommodate this notion of love between persons. I argue that, contrary to the opinions of many moral philosophers, love's moral import is considerable. Accordingly, I construct a set of hypothetical imperatives on the basis of the special set of moral rights and obligations generated by the love relation, and I argue that such imperatives have direct access to ultimate justification. On account of the relative rarity of plausible ultimate justification, I suggest that morality more broadly would benefit from modeling its principles and metaphysical postulates on those contained in this thesis; that is, love should be the foundation for ethics.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew M. Schuler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Langston, Douglas

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 S38
System ID: NCFE003844:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003844/00001

Material Information

Title: Love's Ethics Love as a Legitimate Moral Relation between Persons
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Schuler, Matthew M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Love
Ethics
Morality
Emotion
God
Favoritism
Kant, Immanuel
Sartre, Jean-Paul
Frankfurt, Harry G.
Buber, Martin
Solomon, Robert C.
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis is about love. In the first chapter I attempt to determine what love is and what it is not. In the course of this investigation I address other seminal issues in the philosophy of love, such as the question of whether love involves free choice. I conclude that love--in the complete sense--is a reciprocal relation, springing from a choice, embedded in an attitude, and evidenced by characteristic emotions; importantly, it has as its source a deep and intimate form of knowledge. In the second chapter I bring this definition to bear on several varieties of love, with the hope that some insight will be attained as to which of the phenomena we typically refer to as "love" can be properly so called. The conclusion I draw is that only love between human persons ought to be called "complete." In the third chapter I develop a view of ethics that can accommodate this notion of love between persons. I argue that, contrary to the opinions of many moral philosophers, love's moral import is considerable. Accordingly, I construct a set of hypothetical imperatives on the basis of the special set of moral rights and obligations generated by the love relation, and I argue that such imperatives have direct access to ultimate justification. On account of the relative rarity of plausible ultimate justification, I suggest that morality more broadly would benefit from modeling its principles and metaphysical postulates on those contained in this thesis; that is, love should be the foundation for ethics.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew M. Schuler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Langston, Douglas

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 S38
System ID: NCFE003844:00001

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