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She-Monsters in Nineteenth-Century Novels

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003833/00001

Material Information

Title: She-Monsters in Nineteenth-Century Novels
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Real, Natalia
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Feminism
Femmes Fatales
Monstrous
Femme
Gothic
Victorian
Sensationalist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines the ways in which British women writers in the nineteenth century manipulated "monstrous" female characters in their novels to undermine patriarchal paradigms. In the first chapter I look at two Gothic texts, Matthew Gregory Lewis's misogynist The Monk (1796) and Charlotte Dacre's arguably feminist revision of this novel, Zofloya; or, the Moor (1806). These narratives are structurally similar but convey diametrically opposed messages about women; I argue that while Lewis employs the male Gothic, Dacre subverts this discourse, effectively sabotaging contemporary gender ideologies. In the second chapter, I analyze two Victorian novels, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre (1847) and Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret (1862). While substantially disparate, both texts center on typical Englishwomen who try to carve a niche for themselves in the world while affronting Victorian society. These women take divergent paths to reach their goals; one succeeds and the other fails. I frame my explanation within the confines of the nascent women's movement and contemporary societal expectations of women and their sexuality. Finally, the conclusion to my thesis points to how Gothic and Victorian literature paved the way for the subsequent literary tradition, fin de siecle literature on the starkly feminist and incendiary New Woman, as crafted by both female and male authors.
Statement of Responsibility: by Natalia Real
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 R2
System ID: NCFE003833:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003833/00001

Material Information

Title: She-Monsters in Nineteenth-Century Novels
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Real, Natalia
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Feminism
Femmes Fatales
Monstrous
Femme
Gothic
Victorian
Sensationalist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines the ways in which British women writers in the nineteenth century manipulated "monstrous" female characters in their novels to undermine patriarchal paradigms. In the first chapter I look at two Gothic texts, Matthew Gregory Lewis's misogynist The Monk (1796) and Charlotte Dacre's arguably feminist revision of this novel, Zofloya; or, the Moor (1806). These narratives are structurally similar but convey diametrically opposed messages about women; I argue that while Lewis employs the male Gothic, Dacre subverts this discourse, effectively sabotaging contemporary gender ideologies. In the second chapter, I analyze two Victorian novels, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre (1847) and Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret (1862). While substantially disparate, both texts center on typical Englishwomen who try to carve a niche for themselves in the world while affronting Victorian society. These women take divergent paths to reach their goals; one succeeds and the other fails. I frame my explanation within the confines of the nascent women's movement and contemporary societal expectations of women and their sexuality. Finally, the conclusion to my thesis points to how Gothic and Victorian literature paved the way for the subsequent literary tradition, fin de siecle literature on the starkly feminist and incendiary New Woman, as crafted by both female and male authors.
Statement of Responsibility: by Natalia Real
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 R2
System ID: NCFE003833:00001

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