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Masculinity, Sexuality, and Identity in Three Queer Texts, 1900-1910

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003822/00001

Material Information

Title: Masculinity, Sexuality, and Identity in Three Queer Texts, 1900-1910
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mulkern, Kate
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Queer
American History
Gay
Identity
Men
Sexuality
Masculinity
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: During the turn-of-the-twentieth century in America, both medical discourse and popular culture had established a specific homosexual identity. Homosexual men were the subjects of this discourse as well as actively engaged in its creation. How did these individuals interpret their own homosexual identity in relation to these discourses and what role did their sexual identity play in their overall conception of self? Three authors of the period, Earl Lind, Claude Hartland, and Edward Prime-Stevenson offer potential answers in their narrative. Close text analysis, historical research, and a theoretical framework borrowing from Judith Butler and Michael Foucault are methods used in this thesis to analyze three works written by the above-mentioned authors. Lind, Prime-Stevenson, and Hartland all supported and challenged the dominant discourse's theories on homosexuality. Their sexuality was used to interpret additional identities, namely gender and class as well as their social interactions with other men.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kate Mulkern
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Johnson, Robert

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 M9
System ID: NCFE003822:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003822/00001

Material Information

Title: Masculinity, Sexuality, and Identity in Three Queer Texts, 1900-1910
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mulkern, Kate
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Queer
American History
Gay
Identity
Men
Sexuality
Masculinity
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: During the turn-of-the-twentieth century in America, both medical discourse and popular culture had established a specific homosexual identity. Homosexual men were the subjects of this discourse as well as actively engaged in its creation. How did these individuals interpret their own homosexual identity in relation to these discourses and what role did their sexual identity play in their overall conception of self? Three authors of the period, Earl Lind, Claude Hartland, and Edward Prime-Stevenson offer potential answers in their narrative. Close text analysis, historical research, and a theoretical framework borrowing from Judith Butler and Michael Foucault are methods used in this thesis to analyze three works written by the above-mentioned authors. Lind, Prime-Stevenson, and Hartland all supported and challenged the dominant discourse's theories on homosexuality. Their sexuality was used to interpret additional identities, namely gender and class as well as their social interactions with other men.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kate Mulkern
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Johnson, Robert

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 M9
System ID: NCFE003822:00001

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