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Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003820/00001

Material Information

Title: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Reception and Interpretation
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Miranda, Donna
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Austen, Jane
Adaptation
Feminist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: My argument focuses on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, particularly on the portrayal of the possibilities of women's autonomy and the social practices that limit female agency. In general, I emphasize marriage and courtship in the novel. The first chapter investigates Austen and her novel from a feminist perspective, using literary and anthropological theories from the past forty years. In formulating this section, I employ a feminist anthropological theory concerning patriarchy and the "traffic in women." By emphasizing the socioeconomic imperative for marriage, Pride and Prejudice seems to depict a version of the traffic in women; ultimately, though, Austen alters the marriage plot by granting Elizabeth and Jane Bennet agency in their choice of husbands. The second chapter examines the relation of self-awareness to female agency, as portrayed through the novel's heroine, Elizabeth, and other female characters during the transitional period between courtship and marriage. My goal is to explore the social expectations of young women in marriage, demonstrating how Austen's characters are able to overcome patriarchal limitations through the exercise of personal agency. Elizabeth, in particular, is able to find happiness with Darcy as a result of her ability to experience a higher degree of self-awareness. In the final chapter, I discuss adaptations of Pride and Prejudice as a special form of the reception and interpretation of the novel. I focus specifically on three American theatrical and film adaptations over the past 72 years. My goal is to communicate the intentions and choices of the adapters as well as the constraints they faced in translating a classic novel to performance mediums. I conclude my thesis with a discussion of the Asolo Repertory Theatre's efforts in 2007 to engage the Sarasota/ Bradenton community with Austen's Pride and Prejudice and with their new dramatic adaptation of the novel.
Statement of Responsibility: by Donna Miranda
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Diminio, Andrea; Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 M67
System ID: NCFE003820:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003820/00001

Material Information

Title: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Reception and Interpretation
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Miranda, Donna
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Austen, Jane
Adaptation
Feminist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: My argument focuses on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, particularly on the portrayal of the possibilities of women's autonomy and the social practices that limit female agency. In general, I emphasize marriage and courtship in the novel. The first chapter investigates Austen and her novel from a feminist perspective, using literary and anthropological theories from the past forty years. In formulating this section, I employ a feminist anthropological theory concerning patriarchy and the "traffic in women." By emphasizing the socioeconomic imperative for marriage, Pride and Prejudice seems to depict a version of the traffic in women; ultimately, though, Austen alters the marriage plot by granting Elizabeth and Jane Bennet agency in their choice of husbands. The second chapter examines the relation of self-awareness to female agency, as portrayed through the novel's heroine, Elizabeth, and other female characters during the transitional period between courtship and marriage. My goal is to explore the social expectations of young women in marriage, demonstrating how Austen's characters are able to overcome patriarchal limitations through the exercise of personal agency. Elizabeth, in particular, is able to find happiness with Darcy as a result of her ability to experience a higher degree of self-awareness. In the final chapter, I discuss adaptations of Pride and Prejudice as a special form of the reception and interpretation of the novel. I focus specifically on three American theatrical and film adaptations over the past 72 years. My goal is to communicate the intentions and choices of the adapters as well as the constraints they faced in translating a classic novel to performance mediums. I conclude my thesis with a discussion of the Asolo Repertory Theatre's efforts in 2007 to engage the Sarasota/ Bradenton community with Austen's Pride and Prejudice and with their new dramatic adaptation of the novel.
Statement of Responsibility: by Donna Miranda
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Diminio, Andrea; Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 M67
System ID: NCFE003820:00001

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