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Housing Policy

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003810/00001

Material Information

Title: Housing Policy What went Wrong
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lichtenberger, Adam
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Housing
Institutions
Discourse
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: While tracing the narrow, overlapping, political, cultural and economic paradigms that contributed to what went wrong with federal housing policy; three related trends have emerged. First, since housing was identified as an appropriate realm of government action, a strong bifurcation has existed, separating the institutions which support middle and upper class polities from those of the working classes and the poor. Once relegated to the bottom tier of a bifurcated policy framework, public housing did not attain the necessary funding or political momentum to become broadly accepted as an alternative to indirect or stealth incentives for private housing production. Second, in the nested context of a bifurcated policy framework, bureaucratic efforts to avoid political conflict often undermined public housing possibilities by consistently missing opportunities to forge bureaucratic autonomy. Third, entrepreneurial politicians used elite access to communities of discourse to limit the rhetorical tools available to public housing advocates while ensconcing the primacy of private enterprise into the legislative vocabulary
Statement of Responsibility: by Adam Lichtenberger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 L6
System ID: NCFE003810:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003810/00001

Material Information

Title: Housing Policy What went Wrong
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lichtenberger, Adam
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Housing
Institutions
Discourse
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: While tracing the narrow, overlapping, political, cultural and economic paradigms that contributed to what went wrong with federal housing policy; three related trends have emerged. First, since housing was identified as an appropriate realm of government action, a strong bifurcation has existed, separating the institutions which support middle and upper class polities from those of the working classes and the poor. Once relegated to the bottom tier of a bifurcated policy framework, public housing did not attain the necessary funding or political momentum to become broadly accepted as an alternative to indirect or stealth incentives for private housing production. Second, in the nested context of a bifurcated policy framework, bureaucratic efforts to avoid political conflict often undermined public housing possibilities by consistently missing opportunities to forge bureaucratic autonomy. Third, entrepreneurial politicians used elite access to communities of discourse to limit the rhetorical tools available to public housing advocates while ensconcing the primacy of private enterprise into the legislative vocabulary
Statement of Responsibility: by Adam Lichtenberger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 L6
System ID: NCFE003810:00001

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