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Collective Efficacy and Socioeconomic Status

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003807/00001

Material Information

Title: Collective Efficacy and Socioeconomic Status A Study of Three Neighborhoods
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Krumm, Marissa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Collective Efficacy
Socioeconomic Status
Social Organization
Community
Social Capital
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis explores some of the literature on social capital and social disorganization theory and posits that socioeconomic status, as well as relative geographic location, may either impede or facilitate conditions for collective efficacy, or the shared belief of the collective in its capability to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. The general hypothesis is that three structural factors--low economic status, heterogeneity of the neighborhood, and residential instability--weaken social ties and therefore also the shared expectations and willingness among neighbors to intervene on behalf of the "common good". This may in turn have direct effects on communities' differential abilities to access resources, uphold social norms pertaining to interpersonal violence and other high-risk behaviors, and even the affective state of individuals. Through the collection and analysis of survey and Census data on three neighborhoods in Sarasota, Florida, the results of this study generally support previous research on social disorganization theory, stressing the centrality of residential stability in the formation of efficacious social relations and hinting toward the importance of perceived homogeneity in using Census tract data to predict collective efficacy levels.
Statement of Responsibility: by Marissa Krumm
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 K9
System ID: NCFE003807:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003807/00001

Material Information

Title: Collective Efficacy and Socioeconomic Status A Study of Three Neighborhoods
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Krumm, Marissa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Collective Efficacy
Socioeconomic Status
Social Organization
Community
Social Capital
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis explores some of the literature on social capital and social disorganization theory and posits that socioeconomic status, as well as relative geographic location, may either impede or facilitate conditions for collective efficacy, or the shared belief of the collective in its capability to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. The general hypothesis is that three structural factors--low economic status, heterogeneity of the neighborhood, and residential instability--weaken social ties and therefore also the shared expectations and willingness among neighbors to intervene on behalf of the "common good". This may in turn have direct effects on communities' differential abilities to access resources, uphold social norms pertaining to interpersonal violence and other high-risk behaviors, and even the affective state of individuals. Through the collection and analysis of survey and Census data on three neighborhoods in Sarasota, Florida, the results of this study generally support previous research on social disorganization theory, stressing the centrality of residential stability in the formation of efficacious social relations and hinting toward the importance of perceived homogeneity in using Census tract data to predict collective efficacy levels.
Statement of Responsibility: by Marissa Krumm
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 K9
System ID: NCFE003807:00001

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