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Color Constancy Exhibited by Honeybees (Apis Mellifera) in a Dynamic Lighting Environment

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003803/00001

Material Information

Title: Color Constancy Exhibited by Honeybees (Apis Mellifera) in a Dynamic Lighting Environment
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Keith, Ryan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Vision
Illumination
Color Perception
Navigation
Pattern Recognition
Flower Learning
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Due to its trichromatic nature, honeybee color vision is of great interest to researchers. It has been found that some visual phenomena, such as color constancy, occur in honeybees as well as humans. Because of this, honeybees can provide a simple framework in which to examine these complex sensory processes. This study required subjects to take part in a dynamically changing color constancy task. Subjects were first trained to discriminate a blue target from red, green, and yellow alternatives under either red, green, or white lighting. After learning to discriminate and return to the target, subjects were required to perform the same task under dynamic lighting conditions. In this condition, targets were unrewarded and lighting changed every two seconds from red to blue to green to yellow. No significant differences were found between groups trained under red, green, or white light, suggesting color constancy. However, this does not strongly support the null hypothesis as the test lacked statistical power due to a small sample size (N = 9). If the null hypothesis were supported, it would assist in explaining how honeybees are able to regularly locate the same targets in nature, even under differing lighting conditions and contexts.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ryan Keith
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 K2
System ID: NCFE003803:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003803/00001

Material Information

Title: Color Constancy Exhibited by Honeybees (Apis Mellifera) in a Dynamic Lighting Environment
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Keith, Ryan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Vision
Illumination
Color Perception
Navigation
Pattern Recognition
Flower Learning
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Due to its trichromatic nature, honeybee color vision is of great interest to researchers. It has been found that some visual phenomena, such as color constancy, occur in honeybees as well as humans. Because of this, honeybees can provide a simple framework in which to examine these complex sensory processes. This study required subjects to take part in a dynamically changing color constancy task. Subjects were first trained to discriminate a blue target from red, green, and yellow alternatives under either red, green, or white lighting. After learning to discriminate and return to the target, subjects were required to perform the same task under dynamic lighting conditions. In this condition, targets were unrewarded and lighting changed every two seconds from red to blue to green to yellow. No significant differences were found between groups trained under red, green, or white light, suggesting color constancy. However, this does not strongly support the null hypothesis as the test lacked statistical power due to a small sample size (N = 9). If the null hypothesis were supported, it would assist in explaining how honeybees are able to regularly locate the same targets in nature, even under differing lighting conditions and contexts.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ryan Keith
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 K2
System ID: NCFE003803:00001

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