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Domesticating Women

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003797/00001

Material Information

Title: Domesticating Women Passionate Heroines and the Men Who Punish Them in Zofloya, Lady Audley's Secret and East Lynne
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hunsinger, Anna
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Femme Fatales
Sensationalist Fiction
Misogyny
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The femme fatale, often synonymous with the fallen women, is found throughout literature. Although she is usually utilized only in terms of her seductive powers, British women writers Charlotte Dacre, Mary Braddon, and Ellen Wood developed the femme fatale into something more in Zofloya, Lady Audley's Secret and East Lynne. Each of these novels is especially effective at challenging traditional social concepts of femininity, marriage and gender roles because each features a compelling, rebellious woman who seeks power and control through violence, sexual pleasure, or social and financial advance. Yet these writers also counter their heroines' willfulness through a dominant male figure whose misogynistic tendencies subtly undermine these novels' emancipated tone. At first, their presence seems to suggest mere didacticism and social propriety, but these male characters are themselves open to criticism, ultimately solidifying the imbedded message of social upheaval in these works.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anna Hunsinger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 H93
System ID: NCFE003797:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003797/00001

Material Information

Title: Domesticating Women Passionate Heroines and the Men Who Punish Them in Zofloya, Lady Audley's Secret and East Lynne
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hunsinger, Anna
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Femme Fatales
Sensationalist Fiction
Misogyny
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The femme fatale, often synonymous with the fallen women, is found throughout literature. Although she is usually utilized only in terms of her seductive powers, British women writers Charlotte Dacre, Mary Braddon, and Ellen Wood developed the femme fatale into something more in Zofloya, Lady Audley's Secret and East Lynne. Each of these novels is especially effective at challenging traditional social concepts of femininity, marriage and gender roles because each features a compelling, rebellious woman who seeks power and control through violence, sexual pleasure, or social and financial advance. Yet these writers also counter their heroines' willfulness through a dominant male figure whose misogynistic tendencies subtly undermine these novels' emancipated tone. At first, their presence seems to suggest mere didacticism and social propriety, but these male characters are themselves open to criticism, ultimately solidifying the imbedded message of social upheaval in these works.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anna Hunsinger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 H93
System ID: NCFE003797:00001

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