ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/header_item.html)

Globalization

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003796/00001

Material Information

Title: Globalization Revisiting Marxian Economic Theory
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hujsa, Frank
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Marx, Karl
Globalization
Capitalism
Corperation
Multinational
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In Das Kapital and other writings, Karl Marx produced history's most comprehensive analysis of capitalism. He identified an essential tension within capitalism's internal mechanisms: the increasingly individualistic accumulation of private property contrasted with the integrated global marketplace that was being created. Based on this fundamental contradiction, Marx predicted that capitalism was inevitably doomed to negate itself. Its collapse would pave the way for the rise of global communism, the abolition of private property, and the end of Marx's dialectical process of historical materialism. Rather can collapsing as Marx predicted, capitalism has instead become the world's dominant economic system. Distinguished from the earlier ages of globalization by the centrality of the corporation, modern global capitalism has resulted in unprecedented wealth and prosperity, but also injustice and inequity. The first aim of this project is to provide an overview of Karl Marx's economic theory, distilled from several of his most important works including Das Kapital and the Grundrisse. The second aim is to examine the history of modern capitalism, and to identify the differences between today's corporate globalization and the globalization that has existed in prior centuries. The final aim of this project is to illustrate the special relevance of Marxian economic theory to modern corporate globalization and to answer the important question: If capitalism is shown to have followed the developmental steps predicted by Marx, is it inevitably doomed to fail in the manner that he predicted as well? The conclusion of this thesis is that capitalism is not necessarily doomed as Marx foresaw because of the intervening role that strong government has historically played. Government is the key to saving capitalism from its own self-destructive patterns. However, globalization is considerably weakening the influence of government, which may strengthen some of Marx's contentions that capitalism may self-destruct over time. In addition, therefore, the increasingly global nature of capitalism necessitates global governance.
Statement of Responsibility: by Frank Hujsa
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Strobel, Frederick

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 H9
System ID: NCFE003796:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003796/00001

Material Information

Title: Globalization Revisiting Marxian Economic Theory
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Hujsa, Frank
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Marx, Karl
Globalization
Capitalism
Corperation
Multinational
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In Das Kapital and other writings, Karl Marx produced history's most comprehensive analysis of capitalism. He identified an essential tension within capitalism's internal mechanisms: the increasingly individualistic accumulation of private property contrasted with the integrated global marketplace that was being created. Based on this fundamental contradiction, Marx predicted that capitalism was inevitably doomed to negate itself. Its collapse would pave the way for the rise of global communism, the abolition of private property, and the end of Marx's dialectical process of historical materialism. Rather can collapsing as Marx predicted, capitalism has instead become the world's dominant economic system. Distinguished from the earlier ages of globalization by the centrality of the corporation, modern global capitalism has resulted in unprecedented wealth and prosperity, but also injustice and inequity. The first aim of this project is to provide an overview of Karl Marx's economic theory, distilled from several of his most important works including Das Kapital and the Grundrisse. The second aim is to examine the history of modern capitalism, and to identify the differences between today's corporate globalization and the globalization that has existed in prior centuries. The final aim of this project is to illustrate the special relevance of Marxian economic theory to modern corporate globalization and to answer the important question: If capitalism is shown to have followed the developmental steps predicted by Marx, is it inevitably doomed to fail in the manner that he predicted as well? The conclusion of this thesis is that capitalism is not necessarily doomed as Marx foresaw because of the intervening role that strong government has historically played. Government is the key to saving capitalism from its own self-destructive patterns. However, globalization is considerably weakening the influence of government, which may strengthen some of Marx's contentions that capitalism may self-destruct over time. In addition, therefore, the increasingly global nature of capitalism necessitates global governance.
Statement of Responsibility: by Frank Hujsa
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Strobel, Frederick

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 H9
System ID: NCFE003796:00001

ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/footer_item.html)