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Left Public Life and Its Association with Religion through the 1880s to the 1920s

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003782/00001

Material Information

Title: Left Public Life and Its Association with Religion through the 1880s to the 1920s
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Grimme, Sarah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Intellectual History
Progressive Movement
Social Gospel
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis is an intellectual history investigating the connection and pattern between the Progressive Movement (1890-1920s) and religious literature. The Social Gospel Movement (1880-1910s) is used as a starting point for a discussion on the theological concepts and debates of the Progressive Age. Josiah Strong, a conservative Congregationalist minister and founder of Social Gospel theory, and Walter Rauschenbusch, a liberal supporter of the Social Gospel Movement, were studied. Jane Addams, the founder of the Hull House, and Frances Willard, president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), were studied due to their importance as leaders of major social activist organizations. Addams and Willard were also part of a growing population of female social activists that were being forced to question religious justifications and limitations of female public actions. John Dewey was discussed in the conclusion as his personal evolution mirrored the larger discussion about the place of religion in left public life. This thesis found a decline in the usage of religious rhetoric in the Progressive Movement that coincided with debates about the differences between religion as an institution and religious beliefs.
Statement of Responsibility: by Sarah Grimme
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 G8
System ID: NCFE003782:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003782/00001

Material Information

Title: Left Public Life and Its Association with Religion through the 1880s to the 1920s
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Grimme, Sarah
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Intellectual History
Progressive Movement
Social Gospel
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis is an intellectual history investigating the connection and pattern between the Progressive Movement (1890-1920s) and religious literature. The Social Gospel Movement (1880-1910s) is used as a starting point for a discussion on the theological concepts and debates of the Progressive Age. Josiah Strong, a conservative Congregationalist minister and founder of Social Gospel theory, and Walter Rauschenbusch, a liberal supporter of the Social Gospel Movement, were studied. Jane Addams, the founder of the Hull House, and Frances Willard, president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), were studied due to their importance as leaders of major social activist organizations. Addams and Willard were also part of a growing population of female social activists that were being forced to question religious justifications and limitations of female public actions. John Dewey was discussed in the conclusion as his personal evolution mirrored the larger discussion about the place of religion in left public life. This thesis found a decline in the usage of religious rhetoric in the Progressive Movement that coincided with debates about the differences between religion as an institution and religious beliefs.
Statement of Responsibility: by Sarah Grimme
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 G8
System ID: NCFE003782:00001

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