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A Dark, Constraining Silence

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003766/00001

Material Information

Title: A Dark, Constraining Silence The Relationship between Writing and Identity in Selected Works of Ludmila Petrushevskaya and Anna Akhmatova's Requiem
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Estes, Benjamin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Petrushevskaya, Ludmila
Poverty
Chronotope
Identity
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The purpose of this thesis is to explore the ways in which two twentieth century Russian authors deal with the connecting themes of writing and identity. I use Anna Akhmatova's epic poem, Requiem, to establish that the tradition in Russia, beginning with Pushkin, of mythologizing the poet as a figure who gives voice to the conscience of the people is continued into the Soviet era. In Ludmila Petrushevskaya's short story, "Our Crowd", many of the ideas relevant to concepts of identity left out of Akhmatova's poem, predominately the physical body, are explored in considerable detail. In fact, the body proves to be a central thematic concern for Petrushevskaya. Petrushevskaya's longer novella, The Time: Night, has a narrator who shares the same first name and a similar patronymic as Anna Akhmatova. In this novella, Petrushevskaya demonstrates her familiarity with the literary tradition into which she is writing, often brutally satirizing that tradition. Her narrator, while deliberately and repeatedly invoking Akhmatova's name, also has shades of Dostoevsky's narrator in "White Nights" and Gogol's narrator in "Diary of a Madman". In the end, the most salient features of Petrushevskaya's writing are her attention to the body, her disavowal of traditional methods of concealing and revealing truth from the reader, and the establishment of a poverty chronotope, or a narrative structure where both time and place trap the characters in a manner analogous to a prison.
Statement of Responsibility: by Benjamin Estes
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Schatz, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 E7
System ID: NCFE003766:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003766/00001

Material Information

Title: A Dark, Constraining Silence The Relationship between Writing and Identity in Selected Works of Ludmila Petrushevskaya and Anna Akhmatova's Requiem
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Estes, Benjamin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Petrushevskaya, Ludmila
Poverty
Chronotope
Identity
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The purpose of this thesis is to explore the ways in which two twentieth century Russian authors deal with the connecting themes of writing and identity. I use Anna Akhmatova's epic poem, Requiem, to establish that the tradition in Russia, beginning with Pushkin, of mythologizing the poet as a figure who gives voice to the conscience of the people is continued into the Soviet era. In Ludmila Petrushevskaya's short story, "Our Crowd", many of the ideas relevant to concepts of identity left out of Akhmatova's poem, predominately the physical body, are explored in considerable detail. In fact, the body proves to be a central thematic concern for Petrushevskaya. Petrushevskaya's longer novella, The Time: Night, has a narrator who shares the same first name and a similar patronymic as Anna Akhmatova. In this novella, Petrushevskaya demonstrates her familiarity with the literary tradition into which she is writing, often brutally satirizing that tradition. Her narrator, while deliberately and repeatedly invoking Akhmatova's name, also has shades of Dostoevsky's narrator in "White Nights" and Gogol's narrator in "Diary of a Madman". In the end, the most salient features of Petrushevskaya's writing are her attention to the body, her disavowal of traditional methods of concealing and revealing truth from the reader, and the establishment of a poverty chronotope, or a narrative structure where both time and place trap the characters in a manner analogous to a prison.
Statement of Responsibility: by Benjamin Estes
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Schatz, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 E7
System ID: NCFE003766:00001

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