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A Review of the Effect of Stress, Cortisol, and Toxin Induced Stress Responses on Homeostasis in Humans and Experimental...

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003736/00001

Material Information

Title: A Review of the Effect of Stress, Cortisol, and Toxin Induced Stress Responses on Homeostasis in Humans and Experimental Animals
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Boissoneault, Jeffrey B.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Stress Psychology
Neurobiology
Biology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis reviews recently published literature in an attempt to characterize stress responses particularly regarding the effects of chronic stress on an organism's ability to maintain homeostasis. When a stressful stimulus is presented to an organism, the organism will respond according to Hans Selye's General Adaptation Syndrome. First, the organism will respond with alarm, a phase distinguished by the onset of an endocrine cascade that results in a state of heightened physiological arousal. Afterward, the organism will enter the resistance phase. If the resistance phase is prolonged, the organism is affected by chronic stress. This thesis emphasizes the fact that the stress response is essentially the same whether the stressor presented to the organism is directly physiological (i.e., hypoxia or a toxin/toxicant) or emotional (processed via limbic circuitry). Of particular relevance to human health, stress responses do not always result in quick resolution of emotional stressors, especially social stressors. Therefore, it is common for these stimuli to result in chronic stress, which is implicated in the onset of a number of pathologies. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and cardiac glycosides are used to illustrate how these toxins may elicit stress responses in model organisms, including humans, rats and mice, and lower primates. These particular toxins were chosen due to their importance in global society.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jeffrey B. Boissoneault
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B68
System ID: NCFE003736:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003736/00001

Material Information

Title: A Review of the Effect of Stress, Cortisol, and Toxin Induced Stress Responses on Homeostasis in Humans and Experimental Animals
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Boissoneault, Jeffrey B.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Stress Psychology
Neurobiology
Biology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis reviews recently published literature in an attempt to characterize stress responses particularly regarding the effects of chronic stress on an organism's ability to maintain homeostasis. When a stressful stimulus is presented to an organism, the organism will respond according to Hans Selye's General Adaptation Syndrome. First, the organism will respond with alarm, a phase distinguished by the onset of an endocrine cascade that results in a state of heightened physiological arousal. Afterward, the organism will enter the resistance phase. If the resistance phase is prolonged, the organism is affected by chronic stress. This thesis emphasizes the fact that the stress response is essentially the same whether the stressor presented to the organism is directly physiological (i.e., hypoxia or a toxin/toxicant) or emotional (processed via limbic circuitry). Of particular relevance to human health, stress responses do not always result in quick resolution of emotional stressors, especially social stressors. Therefore, it is common for these stimuli to result in chronic stress, which is implicated in the onset of a number of pathologies. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and cardiac glycosides are used to illustrate how these toxins may elicit stress responses in model organisms, including humans, rats and mice, and lower primates. These particular toxins were chosen due to their importance in global society.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jeffrey B. Boissoneault
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B68
System ID: NCFE003736:00001

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