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Wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Recreational Fishing in Sarasota Bay

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003735/00001

Material Information

Title: Wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Recreational Fishing in Sarasota Bay Conflicts in a Community
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bissell, Tawnya M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dolphin
Environment
Fishing
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Plastic marine debris, especially fishing gear, is a threat to marine life. Wild bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) interactions with recreational fishing gear caused three dolphin mortalities in Sarasota Bay in 2006, a loss of two percent of the resident dolphin community. The dolphins may be interacting with fishing gear during foraging and depredation. Depredation by dolphins has been documented in other fishing areas, but not in Sarasota Bay. The current study surveyed recreational anglers (n=155) and assessed the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program (MRRP) in Sarasota County. Many anglers (65.8%) had heard of the MRRP and 53.5% were recycling line. An estimated 435,859 feet of line has been recycled in Sarasota County to date. Overall, 26.4% of the anglers reported seeing depredation events, usually involving a single dolphin, but groups of dolphins were also reported. The average group size was 2.6 dolphins. Some anglers (n=34) reported that dolphins returned an average of 4.5 times to depredate repeatedly, other anglers (n=20) reported single depredation events. Most anglers (n=124) expressed positive attitudes towards dolphins, 29 anglers expressed negative attitudes, and 2 anglers expressed noncommittal attitudes. Results suggest that depredation by bottlenose dolphins may be common at some shoreline fishing sites in Sarasota County, but more research is needed. Efforts to mitigate fishing gear debris and depredation by dolphins in Sarasota Bay should continue to prevent escalating conflicts between dolphins and recreational anglers.
Statement of Responsibility: by Tawnya M. Bissell
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B62
System ID: NCFE003735:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003735/00001

Material Information

Title: Wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Recreational Fishing in Sarasota Bay Conflicts in a Community
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bissell, Tawnya M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dolphin
Environment
Fishing
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Plastic marine debris, especially fishing gear, is a threat to marine life. Wild bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) interactions with recreational fishing gear caused three dolphin mortalities in Sarasota Bay in 2006, a loss of two percent of the resident dolphin community. The dolphins may be interacting with fishing gear during foraging and depredation. Depredation by dolphins has been documented in other fishing areas, but not in Sarasota Bay. The current study surveyed recreational anglers (n=155) and assessed the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program (MRRP) in Sarasota County. Many anglers (65.8%) had heard of the MRRP and 53.5% were recycling line. An estimated 435,859 feet of line has been recycled in Sarasota County to date. Overall, 26.4% of the anglers reported seeing depredation events, usually involving a single dolphin, but groups of dolphins were also reported. The average group size was 2.6 dolphins. Some anglers (n=34) reported that dolphins returned an average of 4.5 times to depredate repeatedly, other anglers (n=20) reported single depredation events. Most anglers (n=124) expressed positive attitudes towards dolphins, 29 anglers expressed negative attitudes, and 2 anglers expressed noncommittal attitudes. Results suggest that depredation by bottlenose dolphins may be common at some shoreline fishing sites in Sarasota County, but more research is needed. Efforts to mitigate fishing gear debris and depredation by dolphins in Sarasota Bay should continue to prevent escalating conflicts between dolphins and recreational anglers.
Statement of Responsibility: by Tawnya M. Bissell
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B62
System ID: NCFE003735:00001

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