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Invisible Barbarians

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003733/00001

Material Information

Title: Invisible Barbarians Robert Howard and the Cultural Studies Apparatus
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bell, Justin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Cultural Studies
Pulp Fiction
Howard, Robert
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The rise of cultural studies in the past decade has allowed for literary texts to be studied and taught based on the text's ability to indicate or suggest social dynamics rather than the text as an aesthetic object. Because of the focus that this puts on how texts are consumed, it is now possible to academically discuss a far wider range of texts than were previously available to literary criticism. There are however exceptions to the inclusive practices of cultural studies. A conspicuous example is Robert E. Howard, who wrote prolifically for the American pulp fiction market in the 1920s and 30s, created the enduring pop culture icon Conan the Barbarian, and is still widely read today. Though these details would seem to mark him as an appealing candidate for the attention of cultural studies, he has largely been ignored by it. This happens because Howard uses transparent, unambiguous narrative realities to satisfy the desires of his readers. Since most syllabi for academic courses are constructed by selecting texts that can be used to facilitate the examination of specific thematic and ideological issues, his focus on transparency makes his fiction less textured and therefore less useful to teach in academic classes than the works of other well-known pulp authors, and therefore invisible to many arms of the cultural studies apparatus.
Statement of Responsibility: by Justin Bell
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B4
System ID: NCFE003733:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003733/00001

Material Information

Title: Invisible Barbarians Robert Howard and the Cultural Studies Apparatus
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bell, Justin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Cultural Studies
Pulp Fiction
Howard, Robert
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The rise of cultural studies in the past decade has allowed for literary texts to be studied and taught based on the text's ability to indicate or suggest social dynamics rather than the text as an aesthetic object. Because of the focus that this puts on how texts are consumed, it is now possible to academically discuss a far wider range of texts than were previously available to literary criticism. There are however exceptions to the inclusive practices of cultural studies. A conspicuous example is Robert E. Howard, who wrote prolifically for the American pulp fiction market in the 1920s and 30s, created the enduring pop culture icon Conan the Barbarian, and is still widely read today. Though these details would seem to mark him as an appealing candidate for the attention of cultural studies, he has largely been ignored by it. This happens because Howard uses transparent, unambiguous narrative realities to satisfy the desires of his readers. Since most syllabi for academic courses are constructed by selecting texts that can be used to facilitate the examination of specific thematic and ideological issues, his focus on transparency makes his fiction less textured and therefore less useful to teach in academic classes than the works of other well-known pulp authors, and therefore invisible to many arms of the cultural studies apparatus.
Statement of Responsibility: by Justin Bell
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B4
System ID: NCFE003733:00001

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