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Selves as Centers of Narrative Gravity

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003731/00001

Material Information

Title: Selves as Centers of Narrative Gravity
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Barker, Carolyn
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Personal Identity
Dennett, Daniel
Biographical Patterns
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: According to Daniel Dennett, "selves" are "centers of narrative gravity." Narrative is how Dennett sees that humans recognize patterns in the world. The Intentional Stance, a perspective from which we observe people to possess beliefs and desires, enables us to recognize real patterns of people which are beyond our physical observational capacities. Dennett claims that the entities calculated from such patterns are real in the same way that centers of gravity are considered to be real. Selves can thus be understood as the real entities calculated from patterns of narratives about them. These ideas, considered together, form a grounded theory of personal identity that resolves many of the problems faced by classic personal identity theories. It explains how people maintain the same identity over time and how their mental, physical, and social properties are joined together through patterns and narrative into one being. It illuminates the way that we identify problematic cases such as infants, split-brain patients and multiple personality cases. Instead of presuming a transcendental ego or an essential consciousness or body, Dennett's notion of selves offers a useful way to understand how we identify people as complex beings that vary in various contexts.
Statement of Responsibility: by Carolyn Barker
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B2
System ID: NCFE003731:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003731/00001

Material Information

Title: Selves as Centers of Narrative Gravity
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Barker, Carolyn
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2007
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Personal Identity
Dennett, Daniel
Biographical Patterns
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: According to Daniel Dennett, "selves" are "centers of narrative gravity." Narrative is how Dennett sees that humans recognize patterns in the world. The Intentional Stance, a perspective from which we observe people to possess beliefs and desires, enables us to recognize real patterns of people which are beyond our physical observational capacities. Dennett claims that the entities calculated from such patterns are real in the same way that centers of gravity are considered to be real. Selves can thus be understood as the real entities calculated from patterns of narratives about them. These ideas, considered together, form a grounded theory of personal identity that resolves many of the problems faced by classic personal identity theories. It explains how people maintain the same identity over time and how their mental, physical, and social properties are joined together through patterns and narrative into one being. It illuminates the way that we identify problematic cases such as infants, split-brain patients and multiple personality cases. Instead of presuming a transcendental ego or an essential consciousness or body, Dennett's notion of selves offers a useful way to understand how we identify people as complex beings that vary in various contexts.
Statement of Responsibility: by Carolyn Barker
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2007
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2007 B2
System ID: NCFE003731:00001

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