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A Neoclassical Microeconomic Investigation of Choice Problems in Virtual Worlds

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003718/00001

Material Information

Title: A Neoclassical Microeconomic Investigation of Choice Problems in Virtual Worlds
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Thurgood, Neil
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Game Theory
Attribute Analysis
Castronova
Virtual Worlds
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Games, once a niche-market within the large computer gaming industry, have become somewhat of a fixture in modern society. Players, through controlling an avatar, inhabit the virtual worlds within these games, and perform actions that lead to what could be considered living a virtual life. As the large populations within these games comprise societies in themselves, said populations likely offer a wealth of information to researchers because the worlds are similar to our own real world. This thesis sets out to aid in laying a foundation for microeconomic research in these virtual worlds by proposing behavioral models that serve both to illustrate and predict player behavior in virtual worlds. Matters of time allocation between the game-equivalents of labor and leisure are analyzed, as well as formation of player groups known as parties. Finally, consumption behavior is modeled and the thesis comes full circle by attempting to determine what players prefer in game design. I conclude that the models do serve their respective illustrative purposes, and that microeconomic research in virtual worlds is possible. The thesis ends in a plea to social scientists to move their research focus to virtual worlds.
Statement of Responsibility: by Neil Thurgood
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Elliott, Catherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 T5
System ID: NCFE003718:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003718/00001

Material Information

Title: A Neoclassical Microeconomic Investigation of Choice Problems in Virtual Worlds
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Thurgood, Neil
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Game Theory
Attribute Analysis
Castronova
Virtual Worlds
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Games, once a niche-market within the large computer gaming industry, have become somewhat of a fixture in modern society. Players, through controlling an avatar, inhabit the virtual worlds within these games, and perform actions that lead to what could be considered living a virtual life. As the large populations within these games comprise societies in themselves, said populations likely offer a wealth of information to researchers because the worlds are similar to our own real world. This thesis sets out to aid in laying a foundation for microeconomic research in these virtual worlds by proposing behavioral models that serve both to illustrate and predict player behavior in virtual worlds. Matters of time allocation between the game-equivalents of labor and leisure are analyzed, as well as formation of player groups known as parties. Finally, consumption behavior is modeled and the thesis comes full circle by attempting to determine what players prefer in game design. I conclude that the models do serve their respective illustrative purposes, and that microeconomic research in virtual worlds is possible. The thesis ends in a plea to social scientists to move their research focus to virtual worlds.
Statement of Responsibility: by Neil Thurgood
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Elliott, Catherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 T5
System ID: NCFE003718:00001

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