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The Effect of Juncus Effusus on Detritus and Soil Parameters in Central Florida Seasonal Wetlands

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003708/00001

Material Information

Title: The Effect of Juncus Effusus on Detritus and Soil Parameters in Central Florida Seasonal Wetlands
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Smith, Jennifer M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Wetland
Nutrient Cycling
Invasive Plant
Soil
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Wetlands provide many ecological and economic benefits varying from water filtration, aquifer revitalization, and fish nursery habitat. Wetlands are part of global nutrient cycles and are home to multiple wildlife types and species. Historically, these positive attributes have been overlooked and wetlands have been largely degraded. Over time, wetland plant communities change in response to continual disturbance. Populations of aggressive invasive plant species in disturbed locations often out-compete and displace native plant species. This may be of consequence if invasive species have different characteristics than the species they replace and may alter wetland habitat and ecosystem processes. This research investigated the effects of native invasive plant Juncus effusus L. var. solutus Fern. & Wieg on wetlands on a cattle ranch in central Florida. The growth form of this plant was found to protect detritus from cattle activity. Detrital accumulations were high in organic matter, which consequently influenced carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus nutrient cycling processes. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates, showed that detrital properties under J. effusus were similar regardless of wetland disturbance levels. J. effusus detritus properties modeled detritus in Semi-Native habitats more closely than in disturbed habitats. Soil properties under J. effusus varied, depending largely on disturbance levels. Results showed that disturbance negatively influenced organic matter, total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonium, and nitrate concentrations. In conclusion, J. effusus does not cause adverse long-term affects on detritus or soil quality in Semi-Native or disturbed wetlands in central Florida.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jennifer M. Smith
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 S65
System ID: NCFE003708:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003708/00001

Material Information

Title: The Effect of Juncus Effusus on Detritus and Soil Parameters in Central Florida Seasonal Wetlands
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Smith, Jennifer M.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Wetland
Nutrient Cycling
Invasive Plant
Soil
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Wetlands provide many ecological and economic benefits varying from water filtration, aquifer revitalization, and fish nursery habitat. Wetlands are part of global nutrient cycles and are home to multiple wildlife types and species. Historically, these positive attributes have been overlooked and wetlands have been largely degraded. Over time, wetland plant communities change in response to continual disturbance. Populations of aggressive invasive plant species in disturbed locations often out-compete and displace native plant species. This may be of consequence if invasive species have different characteristics than the species they replace and may alter wetland habitat and ecosystem processes. This research investigated the effects of native invasive plant Juncus effusus L. var. solutus Fern. & Wieg on wetlands on a cattle ranch in central Florida. The growth form of this plant was found to protect detritus from cattle activity. Detrital accumulations were high in organic matter, which consequently influenced carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus nutrient cycling processes. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates, showed that detrital properties under J. effusus were similar regardless of wetland disturbance levels. J. effusus detritus properties modeled detritus in Semi-Native habitats more closely than in disturbed habitats. Soil properties under J. effusus varied, depending largely on disturbance levels. Results showed that disturbance negatively influenced organic matter, total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonium, and nitrate concentrations. In conclusion, J. effusus does not cause adverse long-term affects on detritus or soil quality in Semi-Native or disturbed wetlands in central Florida.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jennifer M. Smith
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 S65
System ID: NCFE003708:00001

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