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O Grape, Where Art Thou? A Study of Spatial Cognition in Two Lemur Species (Lemur catta and Eulemur fulvus rufus) in a L...

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003687/00001

Material Information

Title: O Grape, Where Art Thou? A Study of Spatial Cognition in Two Lemur Species (Lemur catta and Eulemur fulvus rufus) in a Laboratory Foraging Setting
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Pytka, Lisa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Primate
Lemur
Spatial Cognition
Foraging
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Foraging is universal; most, if not all animals are required to forage for food. Primates occupy many different foraging niches in a wide range of habitats, yet, primates are all closely phylogenetically related. Hence, primates are an interesting taxon in which to explore the interaction of biological and environmental pressures on cognitive processing. Lemurs, prosimians, are rarely studied in cognitive tasks, but present especially interesting opportunities for studying cognition due to their rapid speciation in a small but geographically varied area, Madagascar. In this study, two species of lemurs (Lemur catta and Eulemur fulvus rufus) performed in a study of foraging and spatial cognition. The lemurs foraged in a naturalistic apparatus similar to ones used in previous work on spatial cognition in primates. In this apparatus, lemurs searched for hidden grapes. An analysis of their search strategies revealed that the lemurs demonstrated use of spatial learning in the basic search task (i.e., they extracted all grapes when all holes were baited) and decreased in search efficiency and spatial search efficiency following a five-minute delay in a working memory task. A third study demonstrated that lemurs were not solving the task through olfactory cueing.
Statement of Responsibility: by Lisa Pytka
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 P99
System ID: NCFE003687:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003687/00001

Material Information

Title: O Grape, Where Art Thou? A Study of Spatial Cognition in Two Lemur Species (Lemur catta and Eulemur fulvus rufus) in a Laboratory Foraging Setting
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Pytka, Lisa
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Primate
Lemur
Spatial Cognition
Foraging
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Foraging is universal; most, if not all animals are required to forage for food. Primates occupy many different foraging niches in a wide range of habitats, yet, primates are all closely phylogenetically related. Hence, primates are an interesting taxon in which to explore the interaction of biological and environmental pressures on cognitive processing. Lemurs, prosimians, are rarely studied in cognitive tasks, but present especially interesting opportunities for studying cognition due to their rapid speciation in a small but geographically varied area, Madagascar. In this study, two species of lemurs (Lemur catta and Eulemur fulvus rufus) performed in a study of foraging and spatial cognition. The lemurs foraged in a naturalistic apparatus similar to ones used in previous work on spatial cognition in primates. In this apparatus, lemurs searched for hidden grapes. An analysis of their search strategies revealed that the lemurs demonstrated use of spatial learning in the basic search task (i.e., they extracted all grapes when all holes were baited) and decreased in search efficiency and spatial search efficiency following a five-minute delay in a working memory task. A third study demonstrated that lemurs were not solving the task through olfactory cueing.
Statement of Responsibility: by Lisa Pytka
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 P99
System ID: NCFE003687:00001

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