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On Pain and Privacy

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003661/00001

Material Information

Title: On Pain and Privacy The Concept of Sensation in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kay, Andrew I.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Wittgenstein, Ludwig
Philosophy of Mind
Sensation
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis elaborates on the concept of sensation as Wittgenstein presents it the Philosophical Investigations, with special attention paid to the notion of privacy. The structure takes the form of three chapters. The first deals with the question of what Wittgenstein means when he argues that pains are 'incommunicable.' I hope to have augmented Wittgenstein' s conclusion that they are not by working some of the principles involved in the argument out in detail. This same chapter shall also contain a more general discussion of philosophical grammar, as understood by Wittgenstein. The second chapter is in two parts, the first being an exploration of the argument of �258 that there can be no private language, by which I refer to my sensations and only I can understand, and the second some discussion of further thought experiments relating to private language from the Investigations. The third chapter is a discussion of some consequences of concluding that there can be no private language and that pains are not incommunicable, structured as a problem about what do about the relationship between a sensation and the subject of whom having it is predicated, in dialogue with R.C. Buck and Jack McDowell. I conclude that there are some philosophical difficulties in Wittgenstein's arguments, but hope that the richness of Wittgenstein's thought, as exhibited in this thesis, provides compelling evidence that his philosophy ought not be dismissed or ignored by philosophers of mind. Rather, a full critique of mind including Wittgenstein and contemporary and recent theorists as resources would be a philosophical boon.
Statement of Responsibility: by Andrew I. Kay
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 K2
System ID: NCFE003661:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003661/00001

Material Information

Title: On Pain and Privacy The Concept of Sensation in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kay, Andrew I.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Wittgenstein, Ludwig
Philosophy of Mind
Sensation
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis elaborates on the concept of sensation as Wittgenstein presents it the Philosophical Investigations, with special attention paid to the notion of privacy. The structure takes the form of three chapters. The first deals with the question of what Wittgenstein means when he argues that pains are 'incommunicable.' I hope to have augmented Wittgenstein' s conclusion that they are not by working some of the principles involved in the argument out in detail. This same chapter shall also contain a more general discussion of philosophical grammar, as understood by Wittgenstein. The second chapter is in two parts, the first being an exploration of the argument of �258 that there can be no private language, by which I refer to my sensations and only I can understand, and the second some discussion of further thought experiments relating to private language from the Investigations. The third chapter is a discussion of some consequences of concluding that there can be no private language and that pains are not incommunicable, structured as a problem about what do about the relationship between a sensation and the subject of whom having it is predicated, in dialogue with R.C. Buck and Jack McDowell. I conclude that there are some philosophical difficulties in Wittgenstein's arguments, but hope that the richness of Wittgenstein's thought, as exhibited in this thesis, provides compelling evidence that his philosophy ought not be dismissed or ignored by philosophers of mind. Rather, a full critique of mind including Wittgenstein and contemporary and recent theorists as resources would be a philosophical boon.
Statement of Responsibility: by Andrew I. Kay
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Edidin, Aron

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 K2
System ID: NCFE003661:00001

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