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The Body Clock in Cells

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003659/00001

Material Information

Title: The Body Clock in Cells A Molecular Phylogeny of Circadian Systems
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kalmbach, Keri
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Molecular Evolution
Molecular Phylogeny
Circadian Rhythms
Body Clock
Biological Rhythms
Molecular Clock
Biological Clock
Evolution of Sleep
Natural Selection
Oscillator
Cell Biology
Biological Psychology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: An endogenous clock provides a significant adaptive advantage to species across taxa. Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells (ipRGCs) provide photic input to the master clock in vertebrate brains, allowing daylight entrainment of circadian systems. Cellular and genetic data suggests that ipRGCs have more in common with invertebrate, rhabdomeric photoreceptors than the vertebrate ciliary photoreceptors, but a number of experiments are necessary to complete the analysis and highlight the functional similarities between invertebrate model photoreceptors and ipRGCs. Melanopsin, the chromophore that grants photoreactivity to these retinal ganglion cells, likely emerged from a genetic lineage analogous to the rhabdomeric photoreceptors, not vertebrate ciliary types, according to functional and morphological homologies. In this study, phylogenic trees were derived from changes in the amino acid sequences of melanopsin. Constructed trees did not provide conclusive statistical support for this hypothesis.
Statement of Responsibility: by Keri Kalmbach
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 K14
System ID: NCFE003659:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003659/00001

Material Information

Title: The Body Clock in Cells A Molecular Phylogeny of Circadian Systems
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kalmbach, Keri
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Molecular Evolution
Molecular Phylogeny
Circadian Rhythms
Body Clock
Biological Rhythms
Molecular Clock
Biological Clock
Evolution of Sleep
Natural Selection
Oscillator
Cell Biology
Biological Psychology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: An endogenous clock provides a significant adaptive advantage to species across taxa. Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells (ipRGCs) provide photic input to the master clock in vertebrate brains, allowing daylight entrainment of circadian systems. Cellular and genetic data suggests that ipRGCs have more in common with invertebrate, rhabdomeric photoreceptors than the vertebrate ciliary photoreceptors, but a number of experiments are necessary to complete the analysis and highlight the functional similarities between invertebrate model photoreceptors and ipRGCs. Melanopsin, the chromophore that grants photoreactivity to these retinal ganglion cells, likely emerged from a genetic lineage analogous to the rhabdomeric photoreceptors, not vertebrate ciliary types, according to functional and morphological homologies. In this study, phylogenic trees were derived from changes in the amino acid sequences of melanopsin. Constructed trees did not provide conclusive statistical support for this hypothesis.
Statement of Responsibility: by Keri Kalmbach
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 K14
System ID: NCFE003659:00001

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