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National Identity in a Center-Periphery Context

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003630/00001

Material Information

Title: National Identity in a Center-Periphery Context Conflict and Accommodation in Russia's Regions
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Difato, Christine
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Ethnic Conflict
Russia
Center-Periphery
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This research project was designed to identify policy decisions or patterns of ethnic treatment and accommodation that exacerbate or resolve ethnic tension. Most ethnic tension occurs within states, and Russia�s internal ethnic conflict presented itself as an ideal case study because ethnically defined regions are located within Russia�s borders. This thesis compares the relationships of the Sakha Republic, Chechnya, Tatarstan, and Primorye with Moscow. Russia is formed around a center-periphery model where Moscow acts as the central authority over a number of ethnically and non-ethnically defined regions. Tatarstan, Chechnya, and the Sakha Republic are ethnically defined whereas Primorye is not. Primorye, therefore, acts as a control in this study to indicate whether many of the demands of the ethnically defined regions are truly ethnonationalist or are really demands for regional autonomy framed in ethnic terms. These four regions present unique relationships with the central authority and thus offer a wide variety of information for comparison. They all have considerable economic bargaining power. Their original experiences of integration into Russia and regional cultural alliances differ, but they have in common Soviet and Post-Soviet nationality policy and the establishment of the ethnofederal system under communism and the Russian Federation. The study concludes that the central authority implemented and reinforced an ethnofederal system that affected the relationships of these four regions with Moscow. The regional demands were sometimes framed in ethnic terms, but, more often than not, these ethnic demands were neutralized in favor of more moderate inclusive demands. The exception was Chechnya. The Tatarstan and the Sakha Republic cases more closely resembled that of ethnically Russian Primorye, showing that economic and political demands outweighed cultural exclusivism in this subset. Chechnya was an exceptional case because of its highly nationalist leadership, external Islamist forces, and a history of conflict between Moscow and the region since its incorporation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Christine Difato
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 D5
System ID: NCFE003630:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003630/00001

Material Information

Title: National Identity in a Center-Periphery Context Conflict and Accommodation in Russia's Regions
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Difato, Christine
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Ethnic Conflict
Russia
Center-Periphery
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This research project was designed to identify policy decisions or patterns of ethnic treatment and accommodation that exacerbate or resolve ethnic tension. Most ethnic tension occurs within states, and Russia�s internal ethnic conflict presented itself as an ideal case study because ethnically defined regions are located within Russia�s borders. This thesis compares the relationships of the Sakha Republic, Chechnya, Tatarstan, and Primorye with Moscow. Russia is formed around a center-periphery model where Moscow acts as the central authority over a number of ethnically and non-ethnically defined regions. Tatarstan, Chechnya, and the Sakha Republic are ethnically defined whereas Primorye is not. Primorye, therefore, acts as a control in this study to indicate whether many of the demands of the ethnically defined regions are truly ethnonationalist or are really demands for regional autonomy framed in ethnic terms. These four regions present unique relationships with the central authority and thus offer a wide variety of information for comparison. They all have considerable economic bargaining power. Their original experiences of integration into Russia and regional cultural alliances differ, but they have in common Soviet and Post-Soviet nationality policy and the establishment of the ethnofederal system under communism and the Russian Federation. The study concludes that the central authority implemented and reinforced an ethnofederal system that affected the relationships of these four regions with Moscow. The regional demands were sometimes framed in ethnic terms, but, more often than not, these ethnic demands were neutralized in favor of more moderate inclusive demands. The exception was Chechnya. The Tatarstan and the Sakha Republic cases more closely resembled that of ethnically Russian Primorye, showing that economic and political demands outweighed cultural exclusivism in this subset. Chechnya was an exceptional case because of its highly nationalist leadership, external Islamist forces, and a history of conflict between Moscow and the region since its incorporation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Christine Difato
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 D5
System ID: NCFE003630:00001

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