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Transitions to Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003604/00001

Material Information

Title: Transitions to Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Berger, Kaitlin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Africa
Democratization
Transitions to Democracy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This study looks at the political liberalization processes that occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa between 1989 and 1995, and develops a framework for understanding why some countries were able to implement free and fair first elections while others were not. Five variables are identified as having a strong influence on transition outcomes: the cohesiveness of the opposition movement, the disposition of the military, the severity of economic crisis, the cohesiveness of the regime, and the capacity of the state. This study then assesses these five variables in four cases of successful first elections: Benin, Zambia, Mali, and Mozambique. Next, the role of these five variables is assessed in four cases of flawed or blocked first elections: Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Kenya. The democratic transition process is described as a bargaining process between the authoritarian incumbent and the pro-democratic opposition. Each of the five variables contributes to the strength of either the former or the latter, thus shaping the outcome of the transition process. This study concludes by describing the progress, or lack thereof, that each country made towards to democratizing after their first elections. The information on the case�s second and third elections show that successful first elections are not indicative of a successful transition, let alone of progress towards consolidating a democratic system.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kaitlin Berger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 B49
System ID: NCFE003604:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003604/00001

Material Information

Title: Transitions to Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Berger, Kaitlin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Africa
Democratization
Transitions to Democracy
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This study looks at the political liberalization processes that occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa between 1989 and 1995, and develops a framework for understanding why some countries were able to implement free and fair first elections while others were not. Five variables are identified as having a strong influence on transition outcomes: the cohesiveness of the opposition movement, the disposition of the military, the severity of economic crisis, the cohesiveness of the regime, and the capacity of the state. This study then assesses these five variables in four cases of successful first elections: Benin, Zambia, Mali, and Mozambique. Next, the role of these five variables is assessed in four cases of flawed or blocked first elections: Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Kenya. The democratic transition process is described as a bargaining process between the authoritarian incumbent and the pro-democratic opposition. Each of the five variables contributes to the strength of either the former or the latter, thus shaping the outcome of the transition process. This study concludes by describing the progress, or lack thereof, that each country made towards to democratizing after their first elections. The information on the case�s second and third elections show that successful first elections are not indicative of a successful transition, let alone of progress towards consolidating a democratic system.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kaitlin Berger
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 B49
System ID: NCFE003604:00001

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